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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back: Pikes Peak history

Images from Colorado Springs' past.

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Cars park on a snowy road in front of a log building. The photo is identified on back as “Black Forest School — 6770 Shoup Road. Sunday School Meeting — 1928, 1929.” MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-2207

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In this Aug. 19, 1903 photograph, a bicycle decorated like an airplane is part of the Flower Carnival, which heads down Cascade Avenue in Colorado Springs. MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-11122

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In this Nov. 30, 1953 photograph: Members of the police department provided an honorary motorcycle escort Monday afternoon when the body of a fellow officer, Patrolman Richard Burchfield (1919-1953), was taken from the Nolan Funeral Home to the Santa Fe railroad. STAN PAYNE PHOTOGRAPHS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-10579

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In this undated photo, Maj. James Randall, right, is congratulated by his wing commander (who is unidentified) after his first solo checkout flight in the F-105 at McConnell Air Force Base, Wichita, Kan. Randall flew combat missions in the Korean and Vietnam wars and received the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Air Medal and the Purple Heart. He lives in Black Forest. AFRICAN-AMERICANS IN COLORADO SPRINGS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 412-115

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photograph shows the Strang Garage Co. Charles B. Strang opened the automotive garage in 1902. The garage was located on North Nevada Avenue, at the intesection with Kiowa Street in downtown Colorado Springs. It’s now the site of the Metropolitan Mountain Transit depot. GORDON SWEET PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 044-4828

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On Feb. 18, 1949, engineer C.N. Pressler poses for a Gazette-Telegraph photographer after the Midland Terminal train has pulled into the railyards on South 21st Street in Colorado Springs on its final run from Cripple Creek. PHOTO BY STANLEY L. PAYNE, STAN PAYNE COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-10685

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Russell Scott (aka Blinky the Clown) sits at a desk littered with hats, a clown shoe and other like items on May 10, 1960. “Blinky’s” coat hangs from the wall. Scott created a Colorado legend and legacy as Blinky, a red-nosed, plaid-jacketed, pouty-mouthed goof whose gentle humor made a would-be thief temporarily reform his ways and whose safety tips prompted generations of children to look both ways before crossing the street. From 1958 to 1998, countless children began their days as Blinky greeted them with his “Good morning/Glad to see you!” song, according to an Aug. 27, 2012, Gazette article. Scott’s career as a clown grew from sketches he performed for children who came to see the elaborate miniature circus he maintained at his home in Security. The Scott’s house on Security’s Sherri Drive was the only home in the development that had an extra front door. It opened into the garage that Scott had converted into a permanent circus. Scott died in 2012 at age 91. PHOTO BY STANLEY L. PAYNE, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-12019

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Children, some carrying musical instruments, board a bus in 1951 at the Myron Stratton Home, with one of the buildings in the background. The bus has “The Myron Stratton Home” written on the side. The photo is identified on back as “MS Home Bus for church & Sunday School Etc.” Winfield Scott Stratton was a miner in the 19th century. The Myron Stratton Home was named for the millionaire’s father. The home opened in 1913, in accordance with the will, as “a free home for poor persons who are without means of support and who are physically unable by reason of old age, youth, sickness or other infirmity to earn a livelihood.” STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-2432

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