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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs' past

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Leo Mohl was born in Vienna in 1909, to Adolf and Frieda Mohl. As a young man, Leo served as secretary of the trade union movement. Leo was taken to concentration camps in Dachau and Buchenwald for his political activities. In 1939, he was released and immigrated to England where he met Hertha Pistol. Hertha and Leo married in 1939 in Scotland. Fearing for their safety, the Mohls decided to immigrate to the United States. They ultimately settled in Colorado Springs, raising dairy cows on farmland that is now owned by the Air Force Academy. Leo died in 2003. MOHL FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 415-118

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At lower left in this photograph from circa 1900 stands Hiawatha Gardens, a historic “gentleman’s resort,” beer garden, casino, ballroom, concert venue and restaurant in Manitou Springs. The original Hiawatha Gardens main building was built in 1889 by F. L. M. (“Flimflam”) Smith and burned down in 1920. A separate open-air dancing pavilion (built in the late 1890s) survived the fire and was incorporated into the current structure, which was built to replace the one that burned. JAMES O. HERMANSEN PHOTOGRAPHIC COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 314-2327

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The Mining Exchange Building at Nevada and Pikes Peak avenues in 1951, It was constructed by mining legend and philanthropist Winfield Scott Stratton in 1902. The building was a major business center where the mines of the Cripple Creek and Victor gold district sold shares to finance their exploration and production activities. STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-8383

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Newlyweds Charles Swem Sr. and Emma Rahm, foreground, picnic with friends at Ute Pass in 1900. Charles Swem was a prescription clerk at the Robinson Drug Co. in Colorado Springs. The Swems lived at 717 E. Boulder St. RAY TURNER PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 487-70

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A 1956 photo shows the marquee of the Chief Theater, which was in the Burns Building, 21 E. Pikes Peak Ave. in downtown Colorado Springs. The Burns was built in 1912 by Jimmy Burns, who became wealthy from gold mining. The building was a local landmark until it was demolished in 1973. PHOTO BY MYRON WOOD, MYRON WOOD COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 002-1468

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In 1949, a charter run of the Colorado Midland Railway travels to Cripple Creek through a snow-covered landscape. A plaque affixed to the caboose reads, “Midland Terminal Special: The Last Run Rocky Mountain Railroad Club.” The Rocky Mountain Railroad Historical Foundation is a present-day descendant of the club. The foundation, begun in 1990, works to restore historic railroad equipment. PHOTOGRAPH BY HARRY L. STANDLEY, MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, 001-2492

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A portrait of Judge Horace Lunt (1847- 1923) dated about 1904. Lunt was president of Rosamont Corp., which acquired land for Colorado Springs parks, including Jones Park. The Harvard- educated attorney also headed the local Chamber of Commerce and was president of the El Paso Club. In 1895, he was named judge for Colorado’s Fourth Judicial District. Judge Lunt Park, 4870 Seton Place in Colorado Springs, is named for Lunt. PHOTO BY CHARLES E. EMERY, MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, 001-7391

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