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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs' past

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An undated portrait of Mabel Bowers Rehm (1883-1974) She was the daughter of Ernest and Mary Bowers, who owned Pikes Peak Fuel and Feed Co. in Colorado Springs. She taught English and history at South Junior High School and published a book of poetry titled “Out of the Distances.” She was a member of All Souls Unitarian Church and was married to Henry C. Rehm, a pastor at All Souls. ALL SOULS UNITARIAN CHURCH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 058-12

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In 1928, Charles Swem Jr. is pictured with his cornet. He played in the South Junior High School band in Colorado Springs. Swem (1912- 1986) as an adult served as a meteorologist in the Army Signal Corps in the India-Burma theater during World War II. RAY TURNER PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 487-72

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In February 1908, a full house prepares to view a performance at the Colorado Springs Opera House. The venue at 18 N. Tejon St. downtown was opened in 1881 by a group of local bankers and silver-mining magnates. In the early days, operas were performed; speakers including Oscar Wilde and musicians such as John Philip Sousa also performed. By the time this photo was taken, it was a vaudeville house; later, a movie theater; and by the middle of the last century, the building was converted for a Woolworth’s department store. STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-5300

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An aerial view of downtown Colorado Springs taken in 1941 shows The Antlers hotel in the center foreground and the intersection of Cascade and Pikes Peak avenues in center. The former Marksheffel Motor Co. building is to the left of the hotel in the photograph. The Marksheffel is longer there, and The Antlers building that is pictured was demolished and replaced by a newer version in the 1960s. PHOTOGRAPH BY ART W. VAN LOPIK, , STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, 013-4626

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In 1916, the building for Ute Iron Spring is shown in Manitou Springs. Besides the mineral spring on site, proprietor Joseph G. Hiestand also had a curio store and hotel. Hiestand also was the official photographer for the Manitou and Pikes Peak Railway. The tracks in the foreground were for the Manitou Electric Railway, also known as the “Dinky Trolley,” that ran from the Stratton Loop Station on Manitou Avenue. STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-2529

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A portrait of the Rev. Henry C. Rehm, who was pastor of the All Souls Unitarian church in the 1930s. He lived in Colorado Springs for many years and taught history at Colorado Springs High School and economics at Colorado College. He was born in Milwaukee in 1878, and he had a law degree from Wisconsin University and was a graduate of Oberlin Theological Seminary. ALL SOULS UNITARIAN CHURCH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 058-11

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In 1930, four men and two women stand in front of an airplane used for carrying the mail. The site is Alexander Field, an airstrip that was located 3 miles north of Colorado Springs, in an area near what is now the Venetian Village neighborhood on the city’s north side. The airstrip was built about 1920 as Nichols Field, on land owned buy the Colorado Springs Company. The field later became known as Alexander Field, after the Alexander Film Co. moved their aircraft manufacturing plant to the site. STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-1020

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