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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

NORAD Santa Tracker Center 2017

NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracker volunteer Meghan Huyck (far right) and other volunteers answer phone calls from children all over the world at Peterson Air Force Base as a part of the annual NORAD Santa Tracking Chrismtas Eve event. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
NORAD spokesman Don Miles gives instructions to a new shift of volunteer Santa Trackers at Peterson Air Force Base at the NORAD Tracker Center. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
Kendall Sukach and other volunteers listen to instructions before a shift change at Peterson Air Force Base at the NORAD Tracker Center. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0
NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
Canadian Lt. Maj. Chris Hache takes a call while volunteering at the NORAD Tracking Center at Peterson Air Force Base. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
Volunteers that speak foreign languages put placards on their desks so if a child calls that doesn't speak English, his call can be answered. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracker volunteer Josh Tomberlin wears a festive hat. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
Veronica Botto and Carlos Botto (left to right) and other siblings have made it an annual tradition to be a Santa tracker at the NORAD Tracking Center. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
Maj. Andrew Hennessy with the Canadian Army uses a computer to check in on his Facebook, while away from home serving in the U.S. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

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NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracker volunteerTasheka Ruggs takes a call. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0
NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0
NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0
NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0
NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0
NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracker volunteer Erin Nauman takes a call. Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0
NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0
NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0
NORAD Santa Trackers
Santa tracking started back in 1955, when a young boy dialed a misprinted number from an advertisement and got Continental Defense Air Command on the phone. After the boy was assured that Santa would make it home safely, a tradition was born. This year, fifteen hundred volunteers give up two hours on their Christmas Eve to answer calls from children all over the world with questions about Santa's whereabouts at that time. Sunday, December 24, 2017. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

JERILEE BENNETT, THE GAZETTE

0