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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs' past

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In this August 1895 photograph, a carriage pulled by a team of horses and holding four well-dressed and decorated women stands on dirt road in front of a large house with striped awnings in Colorado Springs. ABBY KERNOCHAN PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 103-5243

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Helen Hunt Jackson’s house is pictured in September 1961. The home at Kiowa and Weber streets was demolished that same year. According to Pikes Peak Library archives, the original cottage was built in 1873 for Jackson and her husband, William S. Jackson, and enlarged by him in 1893, eight years after his wife’s death. Helen Hunt Jackson (1830-1885) is one of Colorado Springs’ most prominent historical figures. The poet and novelist became an activist on behalf of the plight of Native Americans and their treatment by the federal government. PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES AND HELEN MCCAFFERY, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 266-10039

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In this photograph from Oct. 28, 1967, Colorado Springs resident and Tuskegee Airman, Lt. Col. James Randall, right, and U.S. Sen. Howard W. Cannon check out topographical maps before their flight in the F-11A. As the Gazette reported in 2013, during the Vietnam War, Randall was part of Operation Rolling Thunder, an early attempt to cripple North Vietnam’s fighting capability by destroying supplies and transport routes behind enemy lines. Randall now lives north of Colorado Springs near Black Forest. Cannon was a senator from Nevada and a member of the Air Force Reserve. GENERAL DYNAMICS PHOTO, AFRICAN-AMERICANS IN COLORADO SPRINGS COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 412-119

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In this 1895 photograph, a hand-tinted view down Pikes Peak Avenue toward the first Antlers Hotel with Pikes Peak in the distance. Streetcar is in center of street, and horse-drawn carriage drive on both sides of the street in downtown Colorado Springs. ABBY KERNOCHAN PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 103-4092

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In an undated photograph, Selena Charlton shows people to their tables while the band warms up at the Cotton Club. Charlton was sister to Fannie Mae Duncan, owner of the club who broke racial barriers in Colorado Springs in the 1950s. The club, which was on West Colorado Avenue, was the first in the city to permit patrons regardless of race. In addition, Duncan’s club afforded African-American entertainers, including Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, B.B. King, a performance stage and lodging at a time when The Broadmoor and The Antlers allowed only white performers. “AFRICAN-AMERICANS IN COLORADO SPRINGS,” COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 412-106

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In a photograph dated July 7, 1936, patrons enjoy drinks in a sidewalk cafe at The Antlers hotel. While The Antlers has been located on the same site at Cascade Avenue and East Pikes Peak Avenue since it was founded by Gen. William Jackson Palmer in 1871, there have been three different buildings. The first hotel was destroyed by fire on Oct. 1, 1898. The version of the hotel pictured was built in 1901 and remained in operation until 1964. The current hotel opened March 20, 1967. MCFARLAND PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 432-2

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James Randall, shown circa 1952, was a Tuskegee Airman. His career as a fighter pilot includes logging more than 7,300 flying hours in numerous aircraft, including the F-105 Thunderchief. Randall joined the Army Air Corps in 1945 and, after completing basic training, was assigned to Tuskegee Army Airfield in Alabama. He was commissioned as an officer in 1950, then assigned to Perrin Air Force Base, Texas, as a flight instructor. He later moved to Craig Air Force Base in Alabama to be an F-51 instructor. Assigned to the 12th Fighter Bomb Squadron, Randall flew 75 F-51 combat missions in the Korean War. Later, during the Vietnam War, he added 44 combat missions before being shot down over Vietnam. His decorations include the Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal and Purple Heart. Randall lives in Colorado Springs. COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 412-141

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