Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

Denver Broncos all-time leading rushers

As training camp gets underway, running back C.J. Anderson is in position to move up several spots on Denver's all-time rushing list - provided be wins the starting job. Here are the Broncos' 11 most prolific runners entering the 2017 season.

12. C.J. Anderson

12. C.J. Anderson

Years: 4 (2013-16)

Yards: 2,044

Average: 4.6

Touchdowns: 17

Currently atop the Broncos’ depth chart at running back, Anderson could climb several spots on this list if he can avoid injury. He rushed for a combined 1,569 yards in 2014-15 as a part-time starter. After the Broncos matched a lucrative offer sheet from Miami prior to the 2016 season, Anderson’s season was ended by an injury in Week 6.

Christian Murdock

0
11. Bobby Humphrey

11. Bobby Humphrey

Years: 3 (1989-91)

Yards: 2,386

Average: 4.0

Touchdowns: 14

Humphrey rushed for over 1,000 years in each of his first two seasons after being a 1989 supplemental first-round pick. A contract holdout in 1991 cost him most of that season and also soured his relationship with the team. He was traded to the Miami Dolphins prior to the 1992 season.

Associated Press

0
10. Tatum Bell

10. Tatum Bell

Years: 4 (2004-06, 2008)

Yards: 2,591

Average: 4.9

Touchdowns: 15

Bell rushed for a career-high 1,025 yards in 2006 after spending his first two seasons splitting carries with Reuben Droughns and Mike Anderson. Injuries and off-the-field issues plagued him afterward.

Gazette file

0
9. Jon Keyworth

9. Jon Keyworth

Years: 7 (1974-80)

Yards: 2,653

Average: 3.8

Touchdowns: 22

A powerful fullback from the University of Colorado, Keyworth is better known for opening holes for runners like Otis Armstrong, Rob Lytle and Jim Jensen. He scored 10 touchdowns in just 81 rushes as a rookie in 1974, followed by a career-high 725 yards in 1975.

ArthurAnderson

0
8. Clinton Portis

8. Clinton Portis

Years: 2 (2002-03)

Yards: 3,099

Average: 5.5

Touchdowns: 29

A dynamic, albeit fumble-prone, runner in his two seasons with the Broncos, Portis is probably better known for being the player Denver sent to Washington in the trade that brought future Hall of Fame cornerback Champ Bailey to the Broncos.

Andy Rogers

0
7. John Elway

7. John Elway

Years: 16

Yards: 3,407

Average: 4.4

Touchdowns: 33

The incomparable Elway was one of the NFL’s most feared runners from the quarterback position during most of his career. His place on this list, though, is a tribute more to his longevity and consistency. Elway, most dangerous as a runner on third downs, averaged just 213 yards per season and never rushed for more than 304. Fittingly, one of the plays for which he is most remembered was the ‘helicopter run’ on third-and-6 in Super Bowl XXXII.

Gazette file

0
6. Knowshon Moreno

6. Knowshon Moreno

Years: 5 (2009-13)

Yards: 3,468

Average: 4.1

Touchdowns: 26

After a pair of promising seasons, Moreno suffered a knee injury that cut short his 2011 campaign. He opened the next season as a backup until starter Willis McGahee was injured. His strong finish carried over to 2013 when he became the first Broncos runner to rush for over 1,000 yards and receive for over 500 yards in the same season. He signed as a free agent with the Miami Dolphins afterward.

Gazette file

0
5. Mike Anderson

5. Mike Anderson

Years: 5 (2000-03, 2005)

Yards: 3,822

Average: 4.4

Touchdowns: 36

Anderson was a 26-year-old rookie in 2000, having spent four years in the U.S. Marines. He rushed for 1,487 yards and 15 touchdowns in his rookie season, but found himself playing second fiddle to Terrell Davis in 2001 and Clinton Portis in 2002-03. After Portis was traded, Anderson responded with another 1,000-yard season in 2005 before signing as a free agent with the Baltimore Ravens.

Gazette file

0
4. Otis Armstrong

4. Otis Armstrong

Years: 8 (1973-80)

Yards: 4,453

Average: 4.4

Touchdowns: 25

Armstrong was drafted in the first round of the 1973 draft as the heir-apparent to franchise cornerstone Floyd Little. He led the NFL with 1,407 yards in 1974, which at the time was the 10th-best total in league history. Injuries took their toll over the course of his career – he has said he suffered 17 upper-body fractures – limiting his playing time.

Associated Press

0
3. Sammy Winder

3. Sammy Winder

Years: 9 (1982-90)

Yards: 5,427

Average: 3.6

Touchdowns: 39

Who can forget the “Mississippi Mud Dance?” Winder was able to perform his popular touchdown celebration 39 times during his nine-year career, including three Super Bowls. Winder was remarkable for his durability, playing in 14 of more games in all but two of his nine seasons.

Associated Press

0
2. Floyd Little

2. Floyd Little

Years: 9 (1967-75)

Yards: 6,323

Average: 3.9

Touchdowns: 43

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010, Little is considered by many as the savior of pro football in Denver. In 1967 there was serious talk about moving the team to Birmingham, Ala. The signing of first-round pick Little gave legitimacy to a franchise that had previously been the butt of jokes.

The Associated Press

0
1. Terrell Davis

1. Terrell Davis

Years: 7 (1995-2001)

Yards: 7,607

Average: 4.6

Touchdowns: 60

A relatively unknown prospect when he came into training camp as a sixth-round pick in 1995, Davis’ first real notoriety came on a big hit he delivered on kickoff coverage during a preseason game against San Francisco. He parlayed that into a Hall of Fame induction in 2017.

From 1995-98, no running back in the NFL was more dominant than Davis. During that span, he rushed for 1,117, 1,538, 1,750 and 2,008 yards while leading the Broncos to two Super Bowl wins. He never fully recovered from a devastating knee injury sustained in Week 4 of the 1999 season.

Gazette file

0