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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs' past

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Taken by an unknown photographer, this undated image captures the original Manitou Bath House in Manitou Springs. The patrons on the veranda are dressed for the 1910s or early 1920s. The truck in the foregound is loaded with “Original Manitou Sparkling Table Water Ginger Champagne.” The bathhouse, where patrons could bath in natural mineral springs, was torn down in either 1921 or 1923, according to the website for the Historic Preservation Alliance of Colorado Springs. It was soon replaced with the Manitou Bathhouse that stands today and is on the National Register of Historic Places. MAYALL PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 102-11757

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There aren’t many places outside the Deep South and Southwest where you would want to have a picnic in January, but Colorado Springs, with its abundant sunshine appears to have warmed up some picnickers captured in this photo of a Jan. 17, 1917, get-together. The Mayall Photograph Collection that includes this picture is a large set of images from around the Pikes Peak region and around Colorado from the early part of the 20th century. PHOTO CRAFT SHOP, MAYALL PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 102-11881

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Men examine a building that was probably damaged by a bomb explosion in Independence. According to Colorado Encyclopaedia, the local railroad depot was bombed June 6, 1904, during a mining strike, killing 14. Who was responsible for the bomb is still unknown. After the bomb, Gov. James Peabody declared martial law, and mine owners were eventually victorious over the strikers. PHOTO BY SCHEDIN & LEHMAN, CRIPPLE CREEK COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 192-6003

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Camels pull a stagecoach during a parade on Tejon Street. The street will be the site of a more modern parade Sunday when it hosts the 17th annual Tejon Street Bike Fest, which is expected to draw 10,000 motorcycles and 30,000 people. It will start at 10:30 a.m. RAY TURNER PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 487-10

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On June 29, 1949, Marx Lorig displays a sample of the clothing that made Lorig’s Corral a downtown Colorado Springs attraction for years. Lorig’s father, Marx Lorig Sr., founded the clothing store in 1932 where the Plaza of the Rockies now sits. Before that, the Lorigs had been in the wholesale dry-goods business, serving southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. During World War II, the Lorigs sold uniforms before adding Western wear to their inventory. PHOTOGRAPH BY STANLEY L. PAYNE, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-11768

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In a 1937 photograph, rancher and businessman Raymond W. Lewis is ready for polo. Lewis, nicknamed “Pinky,” is known for his land purchases that expanded the ranch begun in 1897 east of Colorado Springs by Lewis’ father-in-law, William Marion Banning. By the early 1930s, Lewis had expanded the Hereford cattle ranch to 38,000 acres, stretching from Falcon to Widefield. In 1963, Lewis sold nearly 24,000 acres of the ranch to Phoenix-based Lawrence & Stegall Colorado Properties. The Banning-Lewis Ranch, as it became known, has been through a range of ownership, including commercial and industrial developers. PHOTOGRAPH BY HARRY L. STANDLEY, BANNING-LEWIS RANCH COLLECTION, 098-6923

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An aerial view of Pikes Peak with the Summit House is shown in this undated photograph. According to a Gazette story from 2013, Pikes Peak has been topped by a shelter and doughnut shop for more than 120 years. The current Summit House is a squat, plain structure built in 1964. It has almost no windows despite its 360-degree views. The city of Colorado Springs, which owns the Summit House, and the U.S. Forest Service, which oversees the land, plan to revamp the summit. In May, The Gazette reported that construction on a new Summit House won’t begin this summer as planned because a Forest Service-led environmental analysis has yet to be completed. Project planners are eyeing the summer of 2018 to start work. MAYALL PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 102-11899

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Colorado Springs photographer Guy G. Burgess is pictured playing chess alone in this Nov. 11, 1961, image by Stanley L. Payne. Burgess was photographed in his home by Payne, a photographer for The Gazette Telegraph, as the city’s daily newspaper was then named. PHOTOGRAPH BY STANLEY L. PAYNE, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-11477

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