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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs past

 Pictures
This clipping is from a March 1954 edition of the Phoenix Gazette, which at the time was the Arizona capital’s evening newspaper. The subject of the article was Arleen Hughes, a successful businesswoman in Colorado Springs. In 1939, she took charge of E.W. Hughes Investment Co. on the death of her husband, Edward Hughes. Arleen Hughes ran the company until her death in 1969. And as the enlarged portion of the clipping notes, she served on about 18 boards of directors in the Mountain West, being the boards’ only female member. COURTESY OF DAVID R. HUGHES

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On a stormy day in June 1967, Myron Wood captured this pastoral image of sheep grazing in South Park, the high-elevation grassland area in the valley between the Mosquito and Park Mountain ranges. Park County is dotted with 19th-century ranches, old mines and small towns with colorful histories including Fairplay and Alma. Then there are, of course, the stunning mountain vistas that inspire many a roadtrip. The 1,000-square-mile area known as South Park is now designated a national heritage area. PHOTOGRAPH BY MYRON WOOD, MYRON WOOD COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 002-1269

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On June 29, 1902, a photographer identified only as “Horn” depicted the aftermath of the wreck of a Colorado Midland Railway train. According to DRGW.net, a website dedicated to the history of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad, the Colorado Midland Railway was in service, with some business interruptions, from 1883 until 1920, also moving materials,
coal and ore. Begun as a standard-gauge line linking Colorado Springs to Leadville, the line later added points west. The line was sold to the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway in 1890, went into receivership in 1894, and was foreclosed on in 1897. Sold that year, the line again operated as the Colorado Midland Railway. Another foreclosure came in 1917, and the CM was bought at auction by Colorado Springs millionaire Albert Carlton. The company
survived a few more years, with the last passenger train running Aug. 4, 1918. MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-5592

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A photograph dated July 1981 shows the old Midland School, at 815 S. 25th St. on Colorado Springs’ west side. The three-story red sandstone and brick structure was built in 1902 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, the year before this photo was taken. The 1902 structure replaced the original two-room school built in 1889. Midland in the
early 20th century was known for the leadership of its principal, Augusta Kneipp, according to the website for District 11 schools. The school’s growth led to an annex being built on West Broadway Street, and the school eventually moved to that location. The 1902 building, with renovations over the years, has been a private residence and an office building. PHOTOGRAPH BY MYRON WOOD, FROM THE MYRON WOOD COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 002-798

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In a photograph from the Cripple Creek Collection, in June 1902, five men sit at desks in an office, believed to be the Gold Exchange in Victor. A metal cage lines the sides of a desk at right. Above the desk of the second man from left is a calendar reading: “1902 The Chicago Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway.” A framed sign at left reads “1794 Insurance of the State of Pennsylvania,” and the calendar below the sign shows June 1902. The town of Victor was a center of the gold trade, and by 1893 was known as “The City of Mines.” The region’s largest and richest gold mines were just above Victor, on Battle Mountain. CRIPPLE CREEK COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 192-4291

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Steer wrestling is captured in this image from the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo in 1963. According to the organization’s website, the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo has been an annual tradition in Colorado Springs. It was founded in 1937 by local entrepreneur and philanthropist Spencer Penrose. Since 1946, proceeds from the event have helped support military service members and their families in the Pikes Peak region. The rodeo has been located at a number of
sites, including the Will Rogers Stadium (which was across from The Broadmoor hotel and later renamed Spencer Penrose Stadium. This is the venue pictured. In 1973 through 2001, the rodeo was held at the Pikes Peak Equestrian Center. In 2002-2004, it moved to the Colorado Springs World Arena (now Broadmoor World Arena). In 2005, the event returned to
the equestrian center, now renovated and renamed Norris-Penrose Equestrian Center. The legacy of the Rodeo in the Pikes Peak region was further recognized three decades ago when the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association located their National Headquarters and Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, the rodeo website states. BROADMOOR PHOTOGRAPHS BY BOB MCINTYRE, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 045-7695

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A dance troupe led by folk-dance educator Lloyd Shaw (pictured on left with
fringe shirt) poses on June 17, 1951. Shaw was a teacher, principal and superintendent of the Cheyenne Mountain School District. The site Lloydshaw.
org details how his high school exhibition team, the Cheyenne Mountain
Dancers, toured the U.S. 1939- 1951. The exhibitions renewed interest in
dances that had almost disappeared. STEWART COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-10999

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