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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs' past

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Frederick P. Stevens was one of Colorado Springs’ most admired photographers. His studio, Stevens’ Fotographerie, was located at 24-26 E. Bijou. His father, H. Hoyt Stevens, was the president and manager of the Alta Vista Hotel on Cascade Avenue, which is where Nikola Tesla stayed during his time in Colorado Springs. Undoubtedly, there was also a business relationship between Fred Stevens and Tesla, an inventor and electrical engineer who built the Tesla Experimental Station in the Springs. Stevens sold photographic supplies and probably did photographic work for Tesla. This interesting and remarkably clear photograph of a Colorado Springs power plant was taken by Stevens around the time that Tesla was in town. PHOTO BY F.P. STEVENS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 005-4515

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A crowd surrounds an airplane April 4, 1930, at the municipal airport in Colorado Springs. “Fox Flying House Party” and “Western Air Express” are written on the plane. The photograph is identified on the back as “Fokker F-32 4-7-1930.” According to a report at petersonfield.org, the Fokker F-32 was a four-engined, high wing monoplane that the Fokker Aircraft Co. designed and built in 1929. It marked the first four-engine Fokker design — and the last one designed in the United States — before the company disbanded in the 1930s. The plane was tested at Wright Field and evaluated by the Army Air Corps as the YC-20. However, no orders were made for the plane. STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-1021

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Pvt. Dewey Goodspeed, Battery C, 148 Field Artillery Regiment. Pvt. Goodspeed of 231 E. Vermijo Ave., Colorado Springs, was a well-known and beloved member of his unit. In the history of Battery C 148 FA written by his fellow soldiers after the war, Goodspeed was jokingly described as a soldier who was “Very frivolous and changes girls ever week. The only thing he doesn’t like about the army is being in it. When it comes to busting trucks and motorcycles, Dewey is right there. Dewey is a good worker but he doesn’t believe in demonstrating his abilities.” The photographs in this collection belonged to James Peck of Colorado Springs who also served in Battery C. They were donated to Pikes Peak Library District by his son, Mike Peck, also of Colorado Springs. COURTESY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, IMAGE 422-227

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An aerial view of Glockner-Penrose Hospital and the surrounding streets April 10, 1956, on North Nevada Avenue in Colorado Springs. The facility, founded in 1890, was known as the Glockner Tuberculosis Sanatorium, according to elpomar.org. In 1893, the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati took over the hospital, and it added services over the years. In 1939, Glockner Medical Facility became the site of the Penrose Tumor Institute, and in 1947, the hospital was renamed Glockner-Penrose Hospital to recognize the contributions of Spencer and Julie Penrose through the El Pomar Foundation. The name was changed to Penrose Hospital after Julie Penrose gave $3.2 million to pay for the addition of a 12-story tower. Now the hospital is part of Penrose-St. Francis Health Services. PHOTO BY STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-1026

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In this 1896 photograph, a cloud of smoke and flames billowing over small wooden buildings during the Cripple Creek fire. Fully-loaded horse-drawn wagons stand in the street in front of wooden buildings. Myers Avenue, A Street and Gold Hill are identified on the photo. CRIPPLE CREEK PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 174-3483

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This 1949 photograph by Bob McIntyre is titled “Gateway to Garden of the Gods. According to the Garden of the Gods Visitor & Nature Center website, Charles Elliott Perkins, the head of the Burlington Railroad, purchased two-hundred and forty acres in the Garden of the Gods for a summer home in 1879. He later added to the property but never built on it. Perkins died in 1907 before he made arrangements for the land to become a public park, although it had been open to the public for years. In 1909, Perkins’ children, knowing their father’s feelings for the land, conveyed his four-hundred eighty acres to the city of Colorado Springs. It would be known as the Garden of the Gods “where it shall remain free to the public, where no intoxicating liquors shall be manufactured, sold, or dispensed, where no building or structure shall be erected except those necessary to properly care for, protect, and maintain the area as a public park.” BROADMOOR PHOTOGRAPHS BY BOB MCINTYRE, PHOTO COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 045-6059

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Ruth Banning Lewis sits at her desk, her hand on an open book in 1943. The clock reads 12:15. In 1921, Ruth Banning and Raymond Lewis got married, according to “Dealing with Urban Sprawl,” written by Sara Gugelmeyer. Banning was from a prominent Colorado Springs family, whose business ventures included ranching, ice and coal, and returned to the area after graduating from Wellesley College. Lewis graduated from Colorado College and owned cattle near Fowler. Once they were married, Ruth bought 10 heifers at the National Western Stock Show in Denver and combined them with the Lewis family’s cattle. The Banning-Lewis was once a 30,000-acre thriving Hereford ranch, well-known around the world for its Colorado Domino-type Herefords. PHOTO BY LOYDE KNUTSON, BANNING-LEWIS RANCH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 098-11670

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