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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs' past

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This photograph titled, “Manitou Springs Flood”, shows storefronts in Manitou in 1921 with buckled sidewalks and exposed streetcar tracks after the flood. Children are crossing the street to stores. According to a Westside Pioneer article by Mel McFarland, published on Feb. 9, 2014, the flood in June 1921 was a result of heavy rains on the south side of Pike’s Peak, combined with heavy snow run-off from a big snowstorm. The combined water rushed down and flooded Ruxton Creek. Several houses on Ruxton Avenue were washed downhill, almost all the way to the loop. Just above the loop, the creek was running in the street. The streets in Manitou, as well as Colorado Springs, were not yet paved. The flooding was worse where Ruxton Creek met Fountain Creek near the spa building. A temporary lake formed about where the Manitou Springs swimming pool is now located. The streetcar and railroad lines from Colorado Springs were blocked by the muck and water. El Paso Boulevard was the only road automobiles could use to get through. A flood on the Arkansas River and Fountain Creek occurred in Pueblo at the same time. It was so bad, the National Guard was not allowing people to get off the train in Pueblo without a permit. This was also the case in Manitou. Within a few days, the town was returning to normal. The walls along Ruxton and Fountain Creeks mainly are a result of the 1921 flood. MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, PHOTO BY HARRY L. STANDLEY, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-143

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The caption under the photo reads: “The Women’s Athletic Association of Colorado College gave a picnic Saturday at Austin Bluff for all women freshmen at the college. The girls left Ticknor hall at 8 o’clock by bus. Above are some of the ‘early birds’ waiting patiently to get started. They are, left to right: Margy Krafft, Connie Koehler, Lois Peterson, Elizabeth Van Rensselaer, Carol Fisher, and Mary Schlosser. Dr. Lloyd Shaw, superintendent of the Cheyenne Mountain school addressed the girls and made them welcome.” The photo appeared in the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph on Sept. 17, 1947, Page 10. PHOTO BY STANLEY L. PAYNE, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-10637

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This photograph taken in the time frame of 1890-1900 shows the interior view of Grace Church in Colorado Springs showing pews and columns. According to the church’s website, Grace Episcopal Church formally organized in 1873, was first erected on land donated by the city’s founder, Gen. William Jackson Palmer. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church was organized about 20 years later and built at Tejon Street and Monument Avenue (currently the parish hall). In 1923, the two parishes merged to become Grace and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church and commissioned the Late English Gothic church building, which was dedicated in 1929. PHOTO BY HORACE S. POLEY, POLEY COLLECTION, COURTESY OF THE PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 010-7101

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DISTRICTThis photograph, taken sometime between 1892 and 1900 in Colorado Springs, is identified on the back: “Couple in ‘Rig’ Kiowa Street and Cascade Avenue. / St. Mary’s Church, right background.” Count and Countess Pourtales built and lived in the house on the left. The photograph comes from the Margaretta M. Boas Photograph Collection. According to an-other photo from the Pikes Peak Library District, Count James Pourtales was the “builder of the Broadmoor Casinos, a Bismarck imperialist who came to this country to make enough money to support his estate and nine villages in Silesia. Was also most successful in Cripple Creek gold. He is credited with the early development of Broadmoor.” In 1914, the Markshef-fel Garage was built where the Pourtales house once stood. The Marksheffel company was dissolved in 1965, and the garage was torn down in 1967. The Penrose Library now occupies that corner of Kiowa and Cascade in downtown. PHOTO BY ALFRED FREEMAN, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-9022

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A worker in a cap and overalls scratches a cat that is sitting on a vertical standing railroad tie. The photo was taken in February 1964 in Alamosa and is titled “D. & R. G. W. Roundhouse.” The worker apparently is with the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad. MYRON WOOD COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 002-6096

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The Jackson House at Kiowa Street and Weber Street before its demolition in 1961. The original cottage was built in 1873 for William S. Jackson and his wife, Helen Hunt Jackson, and enlarged in 1893 after his remarriage. The steeple of First Presbyterian Church and the back of City Hall are visible in the background. In 1873, under the advice of her doctor, writer Helen Hunt came to Colorado in an effort to restore her failing health, according to the Pioneers Museum. She arrived in November and was not impressed with the Colorado landscape. One source indicates that she thought it a “Scandinavian hell.” Her doctor convinced her to stay in Colorado Springs and over time she grew to love the area, especially Cheyenne Mountain. In 1875, she married one of the city founders, William S. Jackson. STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-1085

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Demonstrators hold signs relating to the 1965 Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches. The signs read “The Vote For All in Selma,” “Freedom Now” and “The Vote is Your Liberty.” The caption under the photo reads: “Colorado College students stood about 20 on city hall steps Tuesday to dramatize Negro voter registration attempts in Alabama and Mississippi. Most, but not all participants followed instructions not to speak during the demonstration.” The photo appeared in the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph on March 17, 1965, Page 1. PHOTO BY STANLEY L. PAYNE, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-10521

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