Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs' past

 Pictures
Mineral water bottling magnate Jerome Wheeler donated this clock in 1889 to the town of Manitou Springs for the opening of the Manitou Water Bottling Co. The clock, cast in Italy, was also a fountain. Water flowed from stylized dolphin heads into bowls; the lower bowls allowed “man’s best friend” a drink. The statue on top is of the goddess Hebe, who is the goddess of eternal youth and a daughter of Zeus. She was formerly known as Hygeia, after being misidentified for almost 120 years. It was an honest mistake to dub her Hygeia, goddess of health and daughter of healing god Asclepius, when Wheeler gave the statue to the town of Manitou Springs in 1890. The Wheeler Clock, as it is known, sits alongside Manitou Avenue. Wheeler earned his wealth in banking, mining and railroad interests in the Pikes Peak region and Aspen, according to manitoumineralsprings.org. He was the founder of Manitou Springs’ first bank in 1859 and first fire department in 1892 and provided money to build and improve the city’s streets. The photographer is unknown, but it might be Robert M. Davis or Alexander Martin, according to the Pikes Peak Library District. JAMES O. HERMANSEN PHOTOGRAPHIC COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 314-2322

0
 Pictures
This undated portrait shows a woman in working clothes and a ruffled cap sitting in a straight-backed chair outside a wooden building on Pikes Peak Avenue in Colorado Springs. “Maude Ordelheide, 515 E. Pikes Peak, Mercer Rooms” is written on the top of the print. The photographer is unknown. MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-165

0
 Pictures
A portrait of Eugene L. Anderson in 1948. He is standing behind chicken wire in a ticket booth holding multiple tickets in both hands. The sign to this left reads, “Eighth Annual Colorado Springs Rodeo.” MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-8529

0
 Pictures
A formal undated portrait of Jimmy Burns. After moving to Colorado Springs from Maine, Burns worked as a plumber and street grader before he and a partner bought a gold mining claim and struck it rich in the Cripple Creek Mining District, according to a Sept. 11, 2014, Gazette article. In 1912, Burns — then one of the city’s richest residents — opened the lavish Burns Opera House on East Pikes Peak Avenue with a vast main theater that featured white Italian marble, hanging balconies and a stage big and sturdy enough for an elephant. The opera house was torn down in 1973, but Burns’ palatial family home on “Millionaires’ Row” in the Old North End still stands. MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-6029

0
 Pictures
Portrait of journalist Grace Greenwood (1823-1904). As a correspondent for the New York Times, Ms. Greenwood climbed Pikes Peak to the Army Corps’ Signal Station on Nov. 22, 1873. Born Sara Jane Clarke, she attended the Greenwood Institute (perhaps leading to her author alias) and became a poet, children’s author and the New York Times’ first female writer. She championed abolition and often spoke to Union Civil War troops. She also advocated for women’s rights. She worked for the London Journal and wrote a book about Queen Victoria. MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-8837

0
 Pictures
A view of South Tejon Street with streetcar tracks down the center of the street in 1914. Young men ride bicycles at left, and a horse-drawn wagon crosses in front of the streetcar in the distance. Globe streetlights line both sides of the street. The photo is identified on the back as “South Tejon Street looking north toward Cucharras and Alamo Hotel.” MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-4222

0
 Pictures
A portrait of John W. Garrett in August 1897. He came to Colorado Springs in 1895 and soon opened a sporting goods store, according to the AdAmAn Club website. He had a reputation for being a responsible businessman. According to The Gazette, “Garrett’s care for details was a by-word among Colorado Springs businessmen. Records at the sporting goods store show an account of every single transaction which took place in the 42 years of his business. Garrett did all his bookkeeping himself and his books always balance to the half-penny.” MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-8824

0