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Freedom's Foundation

Boston's Freedom Trail gives visitors a tour of the Revolutionary War and the birth of our country.

A visitor walks though the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. The victims of the Boston Massacre are also buried there. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A visitor walks though the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. The victims of the Boston Massacre are also buried there. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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The Massachusetts State House built in 1798 is one of the oldest building on Beacon Hill. It's known to Bostonians as the new State House so not to be confused with the Old State House, also on the Freedom Trail and the site of the Boston Massacre in 1770.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Massachusetts State House built in 1798 is one of the oldest building on Beacon Hill. It's known to Bostonians as the new State House so not to be confused with the Old State House, also on the Freedom Trail and the site of the Boston Massacre in 1770. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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Visitors follow a 18th century costumed tour guide through the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. A guided walking tour is one of the ways to experience the Freedom Trail. Visit www.thefreedomtrail.org for more information. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Visitors follow a 18th century costumed tour guide through the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. A guided walking tour is one of the ways to experience the Freedom Trail. Visit www.thefreedomtrail.org for more information. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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A couple reads one of the signs along the Freedom Trail near the Haymarket subway station before following the trail through the North End past Paul Revere's house and the Old North Church.   (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A couple reads one of the signs along the Freedom Trail near the Haymarket subway station before following the trail through the North End past Paul Revere's house and the Old North Church. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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A pedestrian walks along the Freedom Trail past the Massachusetts State House on Beacon Hill. The building completed in 1798 is known to Bostonians as the new State House so not to be confused with the Old State House, also on the Freedom Trail and the site of the Boston Massacre in 1770.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A pedestrian walks along the Freedom Trail past the Massachusetts State House on Beacon Hill. The building completed in 1798 is known to Bostonians as the new State House so not to be confused with the Old State House, also on the Freedom Trail and the site of the Boston Massacre in 1770. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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Jennifer Catrambone stands outside the Union Oyster House Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in the Blackstone Bock of Boston after finishing the first half of the Freedom Trail. The restaurant, opened in 1826, is the longest continuously run restaurant in the United States.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Jennifer Catrambone stands outside the Union Oyster House Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in the Blackstone Bock of Boston after finishing the first half of the Freedom Trail. The restaurant, opened in 1826, is the longest continuously run restaurant in the United States. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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The Old North Church is the oldest standing church in Boston, built in 1723, and it played a role in the American Revolution when Sons of Liberty Capt. John Pulling and sexton Robert Newman hung two lanterns in the church's 191-foot steeple to warn patriots of the invading British troops on April 18, 1775, the night of Paul Revere's famous ride.

The Old North Church is the oldest standing church in Boston, built in 1723, and it played a role in the American Revolution when Sons of Liberty Capt. John Pulling and sexton Robert Newman hung two lanterns in the church's 191-foot steeple to warn patriots of the invading British troops on April 18, 1775, the night of Paul Revere's famous ride. "One if by land, two if by sea" is the phase used by Henry Longfellow in his Paul Revere's Ride poem. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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Revolutionary War hero Marquis De Lafayette laid the first stone for the Bunker Hill Monument June 17, 1825, on the 50th anniversary of the battle called the Decisive Day. The British suffered 1,000 casualities, proving the Colonial forces could stand up to the Redcoats. The 221-foot granite monument was finished in 1842. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Revolutionary War hero Marquis De Lafayette laid the first stone for the Bunker Hill Monument June 17, 1825, on the 50th anniversary of the battle called the Decisive Day. The British suffered 1,000 casualities, proving the Colonial forces could stand up to the Redcoats. The 221-foot granite monument was finished in 1842. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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The 2.5-mile Freedom Trail begins at Boston Common, the oldest public park in the United States, and follows events from the U.S. Revolutionary War. The park, established in 1634, has been the site of many historical events since the war. Anti-Vietnam War demonstration, civil rights rallies including one led by Martin Luther King, Jr., and a mass held by Pope John Paul II have been held in the park. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The 2.5-mile Freedom Trail begins at Boston Common, the oldest public park in the United States, and follows events from the U.S. Revolutionary War. The park, established in 1634, has been the site of many historical events since the war. Anti-Vietnam War demonstration, civil rights rallies including one led by Martin Luther King, Jr., and a mass held by Pope John Paul II have been held in the park. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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Jennifer Catrambone finds a spot in the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. The victims of the Boston Massacre are also buried there. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Jennifer Catrambone finds a spot in the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. The victims of the Boston Massacre are also buried there. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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Jennifer Catrambone walks through Boston's North End along the Freedom Trail between Paul Revere's house and the Old North Church.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Jennifer Catrambone walks through Boston's North End along the Freedom Trail between Paul Revere's house and the Old North Church. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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The Granary Burying Ground, established in 1660, houses the remains of many famous Bostonians including Paul Revere who died May 10, 1818.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Granary Burying Ground, established in 1660, houses the remains of many famous Bostonians including Paul Revere who died May 10, 1818. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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Pedestrians follow the red line of the Freedom Trail Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, past the Old State House and the site of Boston Massacre. Built in 1713, the Old State House is the oldest public building in Boston and was home to many debates that sparked the American Revolution.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Pedestrians follow the red line of the Freedom Trail Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, past the Old State House and the site of Boston Massacre. Built in 1713, the Old State House is the oldest public building in Boston and was home to many debates that sparked the American Revolution. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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Visitors explore the Paul Revere House in Boston's North End. The house was built in 1681 and is downtown Boston's oldest building still standing. Revere bought the home in 1770 and lived in it until 1800. Admission to the house at 19 North Square is $3.50 for adults, $3 for seniors and college students and $1 for children. More information can be found at www.paulreverehouse.org.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Visitors explore the Paul Revere House in Boston's North End. The house was built in 1681 and is downtown Boston's oldest building still standing. Revere bought the home in 1770 and lived in it until 1800. Admission to the house at 19 North Square is $3.50 for adults, $3 for seniors and college students and $1 for children. More information can be found at www.paulreverehouse.org. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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The Clough House, next to the Old North Church and Paul Revere Mall in the North End neighborhood, was built in 1712 and one of the few surviving homes from its time. The owner was Ebenezer Clough, the master mason who helped build the Old North Church. Ben Franklin's childhood homes was next door.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Clough House, next to the Old North Church and Paul Revere Mall in the North End neighborhood, was built in 1712 and one of the few surviving homes from its time. The owner was Ebenezer Clough, the master mason who helped build the Old North Church. Ben Franklin's childhood homes was next door. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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A sculpture of Paul Revere by American sculptor Cyrus E. Dallin stands in the center of Paul Revere Mall in Boston's North End neighborhood. Established in the 1630s, the North End is Boston's oldest residential community.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A sculpture of Paul Revere by American sculptor Cyrus E. Dallin stands in the center of Paul Revere Mall in Boston's North End neighborhood. Established in the 1630s, the North End is Boston's oldest residential community. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK

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A visitor walks though the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. The victims of the Boston Massacre are also buried there. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A visitor walks though the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. The victims of the Boston Massacre are also buried there. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Massachusetts State House built in 1798 is one of the oldest building on Beacon Hill. It's known to Bostonians as the new State House so not to be confused with the Old State House, also on the Freedom Trail and the site of the Boston Massacre in 1770.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Massachusetts State House built in 1798 is one of the oldest building on Beacon Hill. It's known to Bostonians as the new State House so not to be confused with the Old State House, also on the Freedom Trail and the site of the Boston Massacre in 1770. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Visitors follow a 18th century costumed tour guide through the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. A guided walking tour is one of the ways to experience the Freedom Trail. Visit www.thefreedomtrail.org for more information. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Visitors follow a 18th century costumed tour guide through the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. A guided walking tour is one of the ways to experience the Freedom Trail. Visit www.thefreedomtrail.org for more information. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A couple reads one of the signs along the Freedom Trail near the Haymarket subway station before following the trail through the North End past Paul Revere's house and the Old North Church.   (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A couple reads one of the signs along the Freedom Trail near the Haymarket subway station before following the trail through the North End past Paul Revere's house and the Old North Church. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A pedestrian walks along the Freedom Trail past the Massachusetts State House on Beacon Hill. The building completed in 1798 is known to Bostonians as the new State House so not to be confused with the Old State House, also on the Freedom Trail and the site of the Boston Massacre in 1770.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A pedestrian walks along the Freedom Trail past the Massachusetts State House on Beacon Hill. The building completed in 1798 is known to Bostonians as the new State House so not to be confused with the Old State House, also on the Freedom Trail and the site of the Boston Massacre in 1770. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Jennifer Catrambone stands outside the Union Oyster House Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in the Blackstone Bock of Boston after finishing the first half of the Freedom Trail. The restaurant, opened in 1826, is the longest continuously run restaurant in the United States.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Jennifer Catrambone stands outside the Union Oyster House Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in the Blackstone Bock of Boston after finishing the first half of the Freedom Trail. The restaurant, opened in 1826, is the longest continuously run restaurant in the United States. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Old North Church is the oldest standing church in Boston, built in 1723, and it played a role in the American Revolution when Sons of Liberty Capt. John Pulling and sexton Robert Newman hung two lanterns in the church's 191-foot steeple to warn patriots of the invading British troops on April 18, 1775, the night of Paul Revere's famous ride.

The Old North Church is the oldest standing church in Boston, built in 1723, and it played a role in the American Revolution when Sons of Liberty Capt. John Pulling and sexton Robert Newman hung two lanterns in the church's 191-foot steeple to warn patriots of the invading British troops on April 18, 1775, the night of Paul Revere's famous ride. "One if by land, two if by sea" is the phase used by Henry Longfellow in his Paul Revere's Ride poem. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Revolutionary War hero Marquis De Lafayette laid the first stone for the Bunker Hill Monument June 17, 1825, on the 50th anniversary of the battle called the Decisive Day. The British suffered 1,000 casualities, proving the Colonial forces could stand up to the Redcoats. The 221-foot granite monument was finished in 1842. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Revolutionary War hero Marquis De Lafayette laid the first stone for the Bunker Hill Monument June 17, 1825, on the 50th anniversary of the battle called the Decisive Day. The British suffered 1,000 casualities, proving the Colonial forces could stand up to the Redcoats. The 221-foot granite monument was finished in 1842. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The 2.5-mile Freedom Trail begins at Boston Common, the oldest public park in the United States, and follows events from the U.S. Revolutionary War. The park, established in 1634, has been the site of many historical events since the war. Anti-Vietnam War demonstration, civil rights rallies including one led by Martin Luther King, Jr., and a mass held by Pope John Paul II have been held in the park. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The 2.5-mile Freedom Trail begins at Boston Common, the oldest public park in the United States, and follows events from the U.S. Revolutionary War. The park, established in 1634, has been the site of many historical events since the war. Anti-Vietnam War demonstration, civil rights rallies including one led by Martin Luther King, Jr., and a mass held by Pope John Paul II have been held in the park. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Jennifer Catrambone finds a spot in the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. The victims of the Boston Massacre are also buried there. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Jennifer Catrambone finds a spot in the Granary Burying Ground Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, in downtown Boston. The cemetery was established in 1660 and is the resting place for some of Boston's most famous residents such as Paul Revere, Sam Adams, and John Hancock. The victims of the Boston Massacre are also buried there. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Jennifer Catrambone walks through Boston's North End along the Freedom Trail between Paul Revere's house and the Old North Church.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Jennifer Catrambone walks through Boston's North End along the Freedom Trail between Paul Revere's house and the Old North Church. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Granary Burying Ground, established in 1660, houses the remains of many famous Bostonians including Paul Revere who died May 10, 1818.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Granary Burying Ground, established in 1660, houses the remains of many famous Bostonians including Paul Revere who died May 10, 1818. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Pedestrians follow the red line of the Freedom Trail Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, past the Old State House and the site of Boston Massacre. Built in 1713, the Old State House is the oldest public building in Boston and was home to many debates that sparked the American Revolution.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Pedestrians follow the red line of the Freedom Trail Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, past the Old State House and the site of Boston Massacre. Built in 1713, the Old State House is the oldest public building in Boston and was home to many debates that sparked the American Revolution. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Visitors explore the Paul Revere House in Boston's North End. The house was built in 1681 and is downtown Boston's oldest building still standing. Revere bought the home in 1770 and lived in it until 1800. Admission to the house at 19 North Square is $3.50 for adults, $3 for seniors and college students and $1 for children. More information can be found at www.paulreverehouse.org.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

Visitors explore the Paul Revere House in Boston's North End. The house was built in 1681 and is downtown Boston's oldest building still standing. Revere bought the home in 1770 and lived in it until 1800. Admission to the house at 19 North Square is $3.50 for adults, $3 for seniors and college students and $1 for children. More information can be found at www.paulreverehouse.org. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Clough House, next to the Old North Church and Paul Revere Mall in the North End neighborhood, was built in 1712 and one of the few surviving homes from its time. The owner was Ebenezer Clough, the master mason who helped build the Old North Church. Ben Franklin's childhood homes was next door.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

The Clough House, next to the Old North Church and Paul Revere Mall in the North End neighborhood, was built in 1712 and one of the few surviving homes from its time. The owner was Ebenezer Clough, the master mason who helped build the Old North Church. Ben Franklin's childhood homes was next door. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A sculpture of Paul Revere by American sculptor Cyrus E. Dallin stands in the center of Paul Revere Mall in Boston's North End neighborhood. Established in the 1630s, the North End is Boston's oldest residential community.  (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

A sculpture of Paul Revere by American sculptor Cyrus E. Dallin stands in the center of Paul Revere Mall in Boston's North End neighborhood. Established in the 1630s, the North End is Boston's oldest residential community. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)

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