Colorado Springs News, Sports & Business

Gazette Premium Content Highway 24 reopens, but more rain, flooding predicted

By Andrea Sinclair Updated: September 13, 2013 at 7:13 am

UPDATE

7 a.m. Colorado Springs School District 11 says it will be business as usual Friday. The district did say, though, that if parents think it's safer to keep kids home, it will be an excused absence.

6:45 a.m. Streams and creeks on the west side of Colorado Springs are raging this morning. Water in the drainage canal along 31st Street is roaring about two feet below overpasses.

6:20 a.m. Cheyenne Mountain School District just updated closures: Cheyenne Mountain Junior High School, Skyway Elementary and Canon School closed due to flooding.

6:15 a.m. This just in from the Pikes Peak Chapter of the American Red Cross: "An evacuation center remains open at First Presbyterian Church – Weber Street Center located at 105 North Weber St. in Colorado Springs, Colo. Ten people stayed at the evacuation center overnight.

"Elsewhere around the state of Colorado overnight 709 people stayed in a total of 8 shelters to escape the flood threat. "

6:08 a.m. Police radio traffic indicates lots of water on roadways this morning. Stay alert on your morning drive and be flexible. Your favorite route may be closed.

5:51 a.m. National Weather Service says western Colorado Springs has gotten 1.5 inches of rain since 4 a.m. Flood watch for that area remains in place.

Flood warning still on for Fountain Creek at Fountain.

5:45 a.m. Crews have repaired a power failure in Fountain that left up to 4,000 customers in the dark this morning. Fountain Utilities says a downed powerline near Fountain Creek caused the trouble.

5:30 a.m. In the Cheyenne Mountain School District, Skyway Elementary and Canon School are closed due to flooding.

5:25 a.m. Kids in the Manitou Springs School District are getting a rain day. the district cancelled classes due to weather and flood conditions.

5:20 a.m. Highway 24 was reopened across Ute Pass this morning just after 5 a.m. But with more rain due today and a flood watch in place, if you're heading east of west over the past, you'll want to have an alternate route or a change of clothes handy.

Any drive this morning will be treacherous as rain continues to pummel the region. National Weather Service radars show more moisture being sucked up from the south toward Colorado Springs.

5 a.m. Flood warnings were lifted for much of El Paso County at 5 a.m., but remain in place for Fountain Creek near Fountain.

A countywide flood watch remains, the National Weather Service wrote in an early morning update.

4:50 a.m. If you're heading to Denver this morning expect snarled traffic. Portions of I-70 have been closed by flooding in the city and a rockslide has closed a stretch of westbound I-70 west of the city.

4:30 a.m. It's still coming down in downtown Colorado Springs and a mist covers the mountains to the west. The National Weather Service predicts rainfall for most of the day in the Pikes Peak region.

While creeks and streams are at or near flood stage in the region, Fountain Creek was showing enouraging signs, according to a gauge downtown. The creek tooped out at nearlt 10,000 cubic feet per second of flow Thursday night, but had fallen to 5,280 feet per second by 4:30 a.m.

4 a.m. Highway 24 remains closed from 31st Street to Cascade, but most other roads in the flood area have reopened.

Authorities say if you're taking a drive today, though, use caution. If the road is covered in floodwaters, don't try to cross it.

Military bases through the region have announced two-hour delays for troops and civilian workers impacted by the floods. Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station is closed.

3:45 a.m. This just in from the 21st Space Wing: "Due to heavy rains and flooding throughout the region, Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station is closed Friday, September 13. This closure is in effect for mission essential and non-mission essential personnel."

3:30 a.m. All eyes are watching the skies this morning as the Pikes Peak region braces for more rain to hit already saturated ground.

 The region remains under Flood Warnings aimed at Fountain Creek.

Some parts of El Paso County recorded nearly a year’s worth of rain in Hours Thursday.

Still, by National Weather Service calculations, the region is far from setting an annual rainfall record.

The Weather Service bases its calculations on a gauge at the arid Colorado Springs Airport, which has lagged behind other parts of the area for rainfall.

By that gauge, Colorado Springs has recently hit normal averages for rainfall, with about 14.5 inches since Jan. 1.

The annual record for precipitation was set in 1999, when Colorado Springs recorded 27.58 inches.

3:15 a.m. As floodwaters ebb in Colorado Springs, police are getting back to their usual work -- a car chase and a vehicle theft case.

3 a.m. The National Weather Service is predicting steady storms this morning giving way to more scattered showers at about 2 p.m. Rainfall totals are a crap shoot. The most rain today fell on Fort Carson, where one gauge recorded nearly a foot.

Meanwhile, flood warnings for Fountain Creek remain in force.

2:45 a.m. The latest stream gauge reading for Fountain Creek in Downtown Colorado Springs shows it is sitting at just below flood stage. The creek is at 7.7 feet, with flooding at 8 feet. It peaked at more than 10 feet Thursday night.

2:30 a.m. Flood danger remains high, the National Weather Service is warning. Fountain Creek, from El Paso County to Pueblo remains under a flood warning this morning that will likely last most of Friday.

2:15 a.m. Colorado Springs police have begun the process of reopening Colorado Avenue and Highway 24 to traffic. Highway 24 will be open to 31st street. Colorado Avenue will be open to Minitou Springs, police said.

2 a.m. Fountain Creek has fallen below flood stage in downtown Colorado Springs.

People downstream, though, have more flooding to worry about. At Fountain, the creek has passed its 8 foot flood stage and continues to rise, gauges show.

1:45 a.m. Colorado Springs police on the west side say things appear to be calming down. Dozens of officers are working flood issues, an as of now they aren't screaming for back up.

Fountain Creek continues to recede downtown. It's just three inches above flood stage, U.S. Geological Survey stream gauges show.

Forecasters say the calm may be decieving. The creek is expected to crest at min-morning today at nearly 12 feet at Fountain, well above flood stage.

A forecaster explained that it takes time for water that's fallen in the high country to head down hill.

1:30 a.m. Latest stream gauge reading shows the level of Fountain Creek measured downtown falling rapidly. The creek is now six inches above flood stage.

1:25 a.m. From the Colorado Springs Police Department via Twitter: Flood Warning for west central El Paso County continues until 2:30 a.m. and for southwestern El Paso County until 3:30 a.m.

1:15 a.m. Flooding continues in El Paso County, but it;'s worse up north. This alert just in from the Associated Press:

"Boulder calls for thousands residents more to evacuate as creek rises to dangerous levels."

1:05 a.m. Some good news from the Colorado Springs Police Department via Facebook: "Manitou Avenue is going to be opened up to traffic shortly."

1 a.m. Flood warnings in El Paso County have been extended until 3:30 a.m. by the National Weather Service.

The Colorado National Guard will be hitting the streets around the state today to provide flood-related assistance.

Here's their release:  Nearly 100 Colorado National Guard Soldiers and Airmen, along with high-mobility vehicles and helicopters, have been mobilized to assist local authorities in search-and-rescue operations in the midst of historic flooding in the state.

Guard members and equipment and have been tasked to assist in search-and-rescue missions and delivering supplies, among other missions.

Additionally, the Colorado National Guard has been requested to provide traffic control points in and around the affected area starting Sept. 13.

Soldiers and Airmen are assigned to the Windsor Readiness Center, and the Boulder, Fort Collins, and Denver Armories, and Buckley Air Force Base in Aurora, Colo.

“Supporting our neighbors in their time of need is one of the most rewarding missions the military has to offer,” said Air National Guard Maj. Gen. H. Michael Edwards, commander of the Colorado National Guard. “Having readiness centers in communities such as these ensures we provide rapid for our communities.”

12:45 a.m.: Schriever Air Force Base has announced a delay Friday for airmen in the flood zone: "2 hour delay for military and civilian personnel who live west of 21st Street and Hwy 24, Cascade, Chipita Park, Green Mountain Falls, Woodland Park and Manitou Springs."

12:35 a.m. National Weather Service shows steady stream of moisture heading for the Pikes Peak region, meaning more rain.

As of this hour, many roads on the west side of Colorado Springs remain closed. The biggest closure is Highway 24, closed from Interstate 25 west.

Many highways around Colorado have been closed by weather, including U.S. 6 over loveland Pass. For the lastest list, go to cotrip.org.

12:25 a.m. Many area streams are above flood stage. Fountain Creek at downtown Colorado Springs is nearly two feet above its flood mark.

12:10 a.m. Get ready for round two. The National Weather Service says another serious band of rain is rolling into the pikes Peak region that will bring another 3-4 hour downpour, adding more water to streams that have already jumped their banks.

A flood warning is in place across the county through the night and will likely stay in place Friday as another storm heads in from New Mexico.

Midnight: The National Weather Service says flood warnings remain in effect across El Paso County. Fountain Creek is expected to crest at 8 feet near Fountain, causing flooding in low-lying areas.

11:45 p.m. Emergency management says area around 30th and Fontmore is an area of concern tonight as floodwaters continue to rise.

11:30 p.m. From Cheyenne Mountain Dist. 12: Skyway Elementary and Canon School closed due to flooding. (Effective tomorrow - Fri Sep 13th)

11:20 p.m.: Fountain Creek is running at 12,000 cubic feet per second at Security -- about 120 times its normal flow.

11:15 p.m. This just in from Fort Carson: "2 hour delay for all military and civilian personnel who live west of 21st Street and Hwy 24, Cascade, Chipita Park, Green Mountain Falls, Woodland Park and Manitou Springs. (Effective tomorrow - Fri Sep 13th)"

The National Weather Service has extended a Flash Flood Warning for western El Paso County until 12:30 a.m.

11:06 p.m. From the Pikes Peak Chapter of the American Red Cross: "COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., September 12, 2013, 10:30 p.m. – The American Red Cross has closed the evacuation center that was in Manitou Springs, Colo.

An evacuation center remains open at First Presbyterian Church – Weber Street Center located at 105 North Weber St. in Colorado Springs, Colo.

The Red Cross urges all residents to take appropriate emergency actions to protect lives and property. If you are told to evacuate please do so immediately and move to higher ground as quickly as possible. If you are in a multi-level home you should move upstairs to avoid being impacted by flood waters.  If you are stranded in a vehicle you should remain in the vehicle until water recedes or emergency personnel arrive to help you. For more flood safety tips please go online to www.redcross.org/prepare.

11:00 P.M. The flood warning for west central El Paso County has been extended until 2 a.m."

10:50 p.m. Rock Creek, west of Fort carson normally flows at about half of a cubic foot persecond. A U.S. Geological Survey stream gauge shows the creek now running at more than 700 cubic feet per second.

Monument Creek is now running at more than 1,500 cubic feet per second.

Fountain Creek was more than two feet above flood stage in downtown Colorado Springs, the agency reported.

10:45 p.m. Flood warnings remain in place until 12:30 a.m.

Rain totals on the Waldo Canyon burn scar over a 24-hour period ending at 10:30 p.m. Thursday ranged from 3.39 inches to 4.49 inches, according to the National Weather Service. At Fort Carson, the range was from 3.5 inches to 11.11 inches.

Rainfall totals elsewhere:

Upper Queens Canyon: 4.49 inches

Upper Waldo Canyon: 3.39 inches

Lower Waldo: 4.33 inches

Upper Williams:  4.25 inches

Camp Creek above Glen Eyrie: 4.53 inches

Douglas Creek at Flying W Ranch: 3.82 inches

Monument Creek at Air Force Academy:  4.19 inches

10:28 p.m. From El Paso County Sheriff's Office via Twitter: "Shelter at 103 Pawnee closed. Center at 105 N Weber (First Presbyterian Church) is open"

10:26 p.m. The National Weather Service says one rain gauge on Fort Carson has recorded more than 11 inches today.

10:23 p.m. Colorado Springs police are on "Accident Alert". That means drivers involved in wrecks that don't involve injuries, alcohol or drugs can file a report after the storm has passed.

10:10 p.m. From the El Paso County Sheriff's Office via Twitter: "Road closures in Manitou area are not likely to open anytime soon. People are encouraged to seek shelter for the night."

10 p.m. Overheard on the scanner: "We have three feet of water on the road, and people are still trying to drive through it."

9:50 p.m. Flash Flood Warnings in El Paso County now extended to 12:30 a.m.

9:45 p.m. National Weather Service reports that parts of Fort Carson have gotten 8 inches of rain, causing streams to flood in southwestern El Paso County.

9:40 p.m. From CSPD via Twitter: New: Flooding closures, SB S. Nevada at Las Vegas, NB S. Nevada at Brookside, WB Arvada at Wahsatch and EB Motorway at Tejon.

9:35 p.m.: Floodwaters continue to rise in El Paso County. A flash Flood warning is in place for western parts of the county until 11:30 p.m.

Many roads on the west side of Colorado Springs are close, including stretches of 30th Street, 31st Street, Highway 24, Colorado Avenue, Fontmore Street, Nevada Avenue, 21st Street.

Live weather updates show steady rain over much of the city as moisture continues to push into southern Colorado from New Mexico.

Police and firefighters report stranded motorists in several locations due to high water.

Fountain Creek and other area waterways have passed flood stage.

The Red Cross has opened shelters at First Presbyterian Church, 103 N. Weber St., and Community Congregational Church, 103 Pawnee Avenue.

9:25 p.m. Police report cars stuck in water in several locations. latest report is on Rock Creek Canyon Road off Highway 115.

9:21 p.m. First good enws of the night from reporter Daniel J. Chacon:

David Hunting, spokesman for the city of Manitou Springs, said there have been no reports of injuries by residents or first responders.

“That’s been a really good thing,” he said.

The city expected to reopen Manitou Avenue late Thursday night, he said.

“We have another storm that we’re monitoring right now that we’re keeping close track of and we probably will not open Manitou Avenue until that one has passed,” he said. “As soon as we have the all clear on the weather for the evening, we’re going to open things back up.”

9:10 p.m. Colorado is is a disaster area. Again.

This just in from the White House:

"The President today declared an emergency exists in the State of Colorado and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local response efforts due to the emergency conditions resulting from severe storms, flooding, landslides, and mudslides beginning on September 11, 2013, and continuing.

The President's action authorizes the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to coordinate all disaster relief efforts which have the purpose of alleviating the hardship and suffering caused by the emergency on the local population, and to provide appropriate assistance for required emergency measures, authorized under Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in the counties of Boulder, El Paso, and Larimer."

8:55 p.m. Firefighters are closing down the intersection of Nevada and Motorway due to rising floodwaters nearby. Colorado Springs firefighters reported they are helping with evacuations at Nevada Avenue and St. Elmo Street. Tejon Street is closed in the area.

8:45 p.m. There was a run on sump pumps at a west side Ace hardware store today. There's been enough rain in western Colorado Springs that even structures not threatened by flooding waterways are soggy with run-off. Rain gages showed about a third of an inch of rain on the city since 7 p.m.

8:40 p.m. The Colorado Springs Police Department said this on Twitter: Flash flooding expected tonight along I-25 from West Hwy 24 to East Hwy 24 & along Cheyenne Blvd east of Cresta Rd.

8:15: With U.S. Highway 24 and several other westside roads closed, the Pikes Peak Chapter of the American Red Cross has established emergecy shelters at Community Congregational Church, 103 Pawnee Avenue, and First Presbyterian Church, 103 Weber Street.

Beds are available at both.

A flood warning remains in effect until 11 p.m. for west-central El Paso County. According to the National Weather Service, Fountain Creek is running high and is expected to crest at 12.4 feet overnight, spilling its banks, and remain high through Friday night.

UPDATE 6 P.M.: Emergency officials have shut down other west-side streets, including the intersection of 19th and Uintah, where several motorists are being rescued from their vehicles.

Crews are installing barricades at West Colorado Avenue and 31st Street, and in Manitou Springs flood warning sirens are once again sounding.

UPDATE 5:24 p.m.: Another heavy band of rain is heading toward the Waldo Canyon burn scar.

It's raining heavily downtown and the storm appears to be heading west. The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood warning for west-central El Paso County until 8:30 p.m. Forecasters warn of rainfall rates of an inch an hour on ground already well-saturated from previous storms.

U.S. Highway 24 has been closed again and emergency crews have restarted flood patrols on the west side of Colorado Springs.

Here are some links to video of flooding in Estes Park, which has been hit hard:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D78cvcyFYJ4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMcsNgQ1WVY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_K54eIArAI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGa6nLWcWEk

UPDATE 3:01: U.S. 24 is partially reopened between Cascade and Cave of the Winds, with one lane clear in each direction, the Colorado State Patrol confirmed.

The highway will close again if weather conditions worsen or the National Weather Service issues a flash flood warning, Colorado Department of Transportation spokesman Bob Wilson said.

"We anticipate keeping the highway open until the next bout of weather, so anyone who needs to get west of Cascade or east of Manitou Springs needs to get there now, or they may get stuck," Wilson said.

Westbound lanes of the highway suffered some damage as flood waters eroded a portion of the road base and a large rock rolled onto the road, blocking about a third of the highway, Wilson said.

"Fountain Creek runs below U.S. 24, slightly east of Cascade and the waters rose to a level high enough to do some damage, but we've got crews out there addressing the repairs.

UPDATE 1:49 p.m.: They are evacuating a couple of neighborhoods along Colfax Avenue in Aurora.

UPDATE 1:30 p.m.: A special weather statement indicating the potential for very heavy rains to develop across the Pikes Peak region Thursday afternoon and into the evening was issued by the National Weather Service.

Bands of heavy rain are already developing across northern New Mexico and southern Colo., steadily moving north, while new showers and storms are growing across southern El Paso County, traveling west, the weather service said.

Several inches of additional rain will be possible later this afternoon and evening across areas which have received heavy rain already and the brunt of the activity will occur after 3 p.m., possibly lasting well into Thursday night.

"Due to the fact that the ground is already saturated, any additional heavy rain will quickly lead to flash flooding," the weather service said. "The flash flooding could be very extensive."

UPDATE 1:19 P.M.: "We are not out of the woods yet," National Weather Service meteorologist Mark Wankowski said Thursday, after a flash flood warning expired over El Paso County and Waldo Canyon.

The Doppler Radar indicated storm clouds have dissipated for the moment, but a new weather cell is making its way north from New Mexico and is expected to hit Colo. by 3 p.m., bringing heavy rains back to the Pikes Peak region.

A flash flood watch will remain in effect until 6 a.m. Friday, Wankowski said.

U.S. Highway 24 is reopening again between Manitou Springs and Cascade as the flash flood warning expired and rains have ceased over the Waldo Canyon burn scar - at least temporarily.

"Crews were out clearing out culverts and making sure nothing got clogged up, working ahead while the highway was closed so we could open it back up quickly for drivers," Colorado Department of Transportation spokesman Bob Wilson.

The highway will be closed if weather conditions worsen and a flash flood warning goes back into effect.

Rainfall totals over southwest Colorado Springs measured up to 4.65'' and between three and five inches over the Westside, Wankowski said. A rain gauge by Cheyenne Creek measured slightly more than five inches, while the east side of the city got far less precipitation.

UPDATE 1:01 P.M. : Manitou Avenue has reopened, according to Manitou Springs city spokesman Dave Hunting.

In Colorado Springs, flood patrols are paying close attention to Camp Creek by Garden of the Gods Road. One police officer indicated the water has risen to about a foot from the road, which is open for traffic in the area.

"We need to report to the Emergency Operations Center, I'm not sure this is the most advantageous choice, to release traffic," an officer on flood patrol said.

UPDATE 12:45 p.m.: Colorado Springs Traffic reported U.S. 24 is open between I-25 and 31st Street. U.S. 24 will remain closed westbound between 31st Street and Cascade and eastbound will stay closed from Cascade to Cave of the Winds.

The Emergency Operations Center communicated a break in the weather for the moment, adding that a new storm cell was expected to travel over El Paso County bringing heavy rain over the region between 3 p.m. and midnight.

"For now we have a break, but the recommendation is to keep patrols up and alert because it will take too long to ramp them back up," an EOC official said.

There is a weather warning. There is some blue sky over the wesatern portion of the city now, but more rain is expected this afternoon.

 

UPDATE 12:21: Colorado Springs D-11 is evacuating Howbert Elementary School on 31st Street.

 UPDATE 12:10 p.m.: U.S. Highway 24 will remain closed from Cave of the Winds to Cascade in all directions for the foreseeable future, Colorado Department of Transportation spokesman Bob Wilson said. Westbound lanes of the highway have been shut down up to 31st Street, as Fountain Creek levels have risen more than a foot above its barriers and water is flowing onto the road.

"The highway will remain closed until the rain stops, or the flash flood warning is cancelled," Wilson said. "But the forecast is that rain will keep falling at a rate of one to two inches per hour, so that warning will likely stay in effect."

An emergency command center was set up at Manitou Elementary School, 110 Pawnee Ave., and city spokesman Dave Hunting confirmed Manitou, Cimarron and Security fire crews are present to assist.

"We have not ordered evacuations of the entire city, but we are urging people to seek higher ground because the creeks are some of the highest levels we've seen," Hunting said. "There is another storm cell moving north so we are monitoring that very closely."

 

 UPDATE 12:03 p.m.: Colorado Springs Fire Department reported Garden of the Gods is closed. Also, we are hearing of a wall of water coming down Boulder Creek above the city of Boulder.

UPDATE 11:45 a.m.: All roads in and out of Manitou Springs have been closed and voluntary evacuations of residents along Canon Avenue, Manitou Avenue, Park Avenue and Ridge Road have begun. El Paso County Sheriff's Office spokesman Lt. Jeff Kramer said people in these areas are being asked to seek higher ground for their safety.

"We have deputies monitoring and observing areas that are vulnerable, especially Ute Pass that we know are problematic, sending real-time information back to the command post," Kramer said.

More than three-quarters of an inch of rain have fallen over Manitou Springs in the past hour, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Fountain Creek at 31st Street and Colorado Avenue is overflowing and the Colorado Department of Transportation has closed U.S. Highway 24 as far as 31st Street.

 

UPDATE 11:34 a.m.:

Colorado Springs Fire Department crews are on flood patrol all over the Westside of the city and scanner traffic indicates the area of 31st Street and Colorado Avenue is taking a real hit from the rain.

Flood patrols observed water levels on Fountain Creek at over a foot deep and started to conduct voluntary evacuations of a nearby mobile home park.

By 11:25 a.m., Manitou Springs residents reported El Paso County Fire and EMS were calling for voluntary evacuations in the city.

Officials are preparing to close all roads in and out of Manitou Springs due to rapidly rising flood waters in Williams Canyon, as reports come in that levels are up to two feet.

 

UPDATE 11:15 A.M - It is pouring rain in Manitou. Rain water is pouring down Canon Avenue, where previous flooding has happened, and floor sirens are going off.

A flash flood warning has been issued for west-central El Paso County until 1 p.m. by the National Weather Service, concentrating on the Waldo Canyon burn scar.

Moderate to heavy storms over Fort Carson are moving north toward the Westside of Colorado Springs and the Waldo Canyon burn scar.

The rain clouds are progressing north at 15 mph, the weather service said.

Locations that will experience flooding include Colorado Springs, Cascade, Chipita Park and Manitou Springs.

Colorado Springs Fire Department flood patrols have mobilized to the Westside to monitor waterways as the threat of flash flooding continues.

Bret Waters, emergency management director at the Emergency Operations Center in Colorado Springs, said fire engines are being deployed to Fountain Creek, Camp Creek and south and north Douglas Creek.

“We’re taking this very seriously, we had a severe flood situation overnight and the forecast has more rain over the next few days, so we’re really trying to get a handle on the situation and keep people safe,” Waters said.

Waters said the Emergency Operations Center was activated Thursday morning and its working closely with meteorologists at the National Weather Service to monitor flood gauges.

“People need to be cautious, stay on higher ground and off the water,” Waters said.

Small creeks and streams in urban areas and highways, streets and underpasses as well as other drainage areas and low lying spots will be particularly susceptible to flooding.

The body of a man was recovered from flood waters in Fountain Creek just before 5 a.m. Thursday by the Colorado Springs Fire Department's heavy rescue unit.

At 9:28 a.m. Thursday, U.S. 24 closed  in both directions from Cave of the Winds to Cascade because of a flash flood warning. The highway will remain closed until the warning is removed, according to the state Department of Transportation.

Police noticed a body floating in the creek near Nevada Avenue and Las Vegas Street while conducting flood patrols in the area around 4:15 a.m., city spokeswoman Kim Melchor said.

The man's identity will be released after next-of-kin identification, but he was believed to be in his 50s.

The El Paso County Coroner's Office will conduct an autopsy Thursday to determine the cause and manner of death, Melchor said.

Police said it was unclear where the man entered the creek.

There were no other reports of missing persons or casualties as a result of the overnight floods, but the Emergency Operations Center would keep monitoring the weather through the day, recovery coordinator Gordon Brenner said.

Flood patrol crews from police, fire and public works worked through the night to monitor conditions and respond to potential flooding along the Westside of Colorado Springs.

CDOT reported the culverts at the mouth of Waldo Canyon were overflowing and washouts were leaving mud and debris on the roadways, shutting down eastbound and westbound lanes.
Dave Hunting, city spokesman, said emergency and city crews in the Waldo Canyon region were getting better at handling severe weather conditions, as were the residents.
“People are learning how to keep themselves safe and how to stay out of flood waters, for now we are all on standby and will act depending on how the weather changes,” Hunting said.
Although Manitou Springs got 3.39 inches of rain overnight, Hunting said the roads were all in good condition and creeks had stayed in their beds without any considerable overflows.
Citing precautionary measures, Manitou Springs School District 14 cancelled classes Thursday. School district officials said there had been a washout by a construction project near the football field between the middle school and the high school, exposing a gas line.

"Storm systems are forecasted to continue throughout the day," Melchor said. "Stay alert to news and weather, avoid ditches, flood waters and low-lying areas."

A flash flood warning has been issued for east-central Fremont County, southwestern El Paso County and northwestern Pueblo County until 11:30 a.m. by the National Weather Service.
The Doppler Radar indicated an area of very heavy rainfall across southern El Paso County and the service said roadways in Fremont County were beginning to flood and streams were at bankful.
“This area of rain is moving slowly east into southwest El Paso and northwest Pueblo counties,” the national weather service stated.
Radars indicated one to two inches of rain had fallen between 7:30 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. in the flash flood warning area.
Thursday’s forecast calls for scattered showers before noon, mixed with thunderstorms between noon and 2 p.m. and showers with likely thunderstorms after 2 p.m.
According to the weather service, there will be an 80 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms into the evening with winds gusting up to 45 mph that will move the storm systems southeast.
Rainfall amounts between a half and three-quarters of an inch are possible.

The weather was extreme in Boulder, too. NBC News reported that water reached as high as first-floor windows in some parts of Boulder, a police and fire spokeswoman said. Dive teams were dispatched after cars were seen floating.

“There was one woman that was on top of a vehicle and the vehicle was actually on its side,” the spokeswoman said. The rain has also caused mudslides 2 to 3 feet deep in some areas, which are impassable “even if you have an SUV,” she added.

Libraries, recreation centers and other Boulder facilities were closed, according to the city’s office of emergency management. Energy companies workers were trying to restore power after several flood-related outages, but expected more problems to be reported as the sun rose, according to the emergency office’s website.

An estimated 4-7 inches of rain fell in Boulder. The Univesity of Colorado at Boulder is closed.

More than 700 customers were without power on Thursday morning in and around the city of Boulder, according to an outage map maintained by utility supplier Xcel Energy.

A Jamestown man was killed when a building collapsed there but early Thursday it was not known whether that incident was attributed to the weather.

Police in Aurora,  closed flooded streets and reported traffic signal outages. Among those trapped by the widespread flooding were a woman and children in their vehicle, and police told the paper they were responding to the incident.

An estimated 4 to 7 inches of rain fell on Boulder between 7 p.m. Wednesday and 4 a.m. Thursday, National Weather Service meteorologist Jim Kalina to the Daily Camera. Leading up to that, between Monday afternoon and Wednesday evening, weather watchers in parts of Boulder had recorded up to 5 inches of rain. Boerkircher told The Associated Press that one person was killed when a structure collapsed in Jamestown. She said no details were available on the collapsed building. "We're trying to get to Jamestown. A lot of towns need assistance, and we cannot get through," she said. Many roads were closed because of flooding and debris. Coal Creek Canyon northwest of Denver was closed because of a washed-out highway. The Larimer County office of emergency information said an earthen dam in the Big Elk Meadows area southeast of Estes Park gave way and residents of Pinewood Springs and Blue Mountain were ordered to be ready to evacuate.
Read more at http://gazette.com/update-4-7-inches-of-rain-fall-on-boulder-1-dead-cu-boulder-closed/article/1506132#YBYL4FQPWRxSUmFw.99
An estimated 4 to 7 inches of rain fell on Boulder between 7 p.m. Wednesday and 4 a.m. Thursday, National Weather Service meteorologist Jim Kalina to the Daily Camera. Leading up to that, between Monday afternoon and Wednesday evening, weather watchers in parts of Boulder had recorded up to 5 inches of rain. Boerkircher told The Associated Press that one person was killed when a structure collapsed in Jamestown. She said no details were available on the collapsed building. "We're trying to get to Jamestown. A lot of towns need assistance, and we cannot get through," she said. Many roads were closed because of flooding and debris. Coal Creek Canyon northwest of Denver was closed because of a washed-out highway. The Larimer County office of emergency information said an earthen dam in the Big Elk Meadows area southeast of Estes Park gave way and residents of Pinewood Springs and Blue Mountain were ordered to be ready to evacuate. Rainfall in recent days that dramatically increased on Wednesday caused the flash flooding that also triggered mudslides and prompted evacuations. The Weather Service said early Thursday that more than four inches of rain had fallen in some areas since noon Wednesday.
Read more at http://gazette.com/update-4-7-inches-of-rain-fall-on-boulder-1-dead-cu-boulder-closed/article/1506132#YBYL4FQPWRxSUmFw.99
An estimated 4 to 7 inches of rain fell on Boulder between 7 p.m. Wednesday and 4 a.m. Thursday, National Weather Service meteorologist Jim Kalina to the Daily Camera. Leading up to that, between Monday afternoon and Wednesday evening, weather watchers in parts of Boulder had recorded up to 5 inches of rain. Boerkircher told The Associated Press that one person was killed when a structure collapsed in Jamestown. She said no details were available on the collapsed building. "We're trying to get to Jamestown. A lot of towns need assistance, and we cannot get through," she said. Many roads were closed because of flooding and debris. Coal Creek Canyon northwest of Denver was closed because of a washed-out highway. The Larimer County office of emergency information said an earthen dam in the Big Elk Meadows area southeast of Estes Park gave way and residents of Pinewood Springs and Blue Mountain were ordered to be ready to evacuate. Rainfall in recent days that dramatically increased on Wednesday caused the flash flooding that also triggered mudslides and prompted evacuations. The Weather Service said early Thursday that more than four inches of rain had fallen in some areas since noon Wednesday.
Read more at http://gazette.com/update-4-7-inches-of-rain-fall-on-boulder-1-dead-cu-boulder-closed/article/1506132#YBYL4FQPWRxSUmFw.99
An estimated 4 to 7 inches of rain fell on Boulder between 7 p.m. Wednesday and 4 a.m. Thursday, National Weather Service meteorologist Jim Kalina to the Daily Camera. Leading up to that, between Monday afternoon and Wednesday evening, weather watchers in parts of Boulder had recorded up to 5 inches of rain. Boerkircher told The Associated Press that one person was killed when a structure collapsed in Jamestown. She said no details were available on the collapsed building. "We're trying to get to Jamestown. A lot of towns need assistance, and we cannot get through," she said. Many roads were closed because of flooding and debris. Coal Creek Canyon northwest of Denver was closed because of a washed-out highway. The Larimer County office of emergency information said an earthen dam in the Big Elk Meadows area southeast of Estes Park gave way and residents of Pinewood Springs and Blue Mountain were ordered to be ready to evacuate. Rainfall in recent days that dramatically increased on Wednesday caused the flash flooding that also triggered mudslides and prompted evacuations. The Weather Service said early Thursday that more than four inches of rain had fallen in some areas since noon Wednesday.
Read more at http://gazette.com/update-4-7-inches-of-rain-fall-on-boulder-1-dead-cu-boulder-closed/article/1506132#YBYL4FQPWRxSUmFw.99
An estimated 4 to 7 inches of rain fell on Boulder between 7 p.m. Wednesday and 4 a.m. Thursday, National Weather Service meteorologist Jim Kalina to the Daily Camera. Leading up to that, between Monday afternoon and Wednesday evening, weather watchers in parts of Boulder had recorded up to 5 inches of rain. Boerkircher told The Associated Press that one person was killed when a structure collapsed in Jamestown. She said no details were available on the collapsed building. "We're trying to get to Jamestown. A lot of towns need assistance, and we cannot get through," she said. Many roads were closed because of flooding and debris. Coal Creek Canyon northwest of Denver was closed because of a washed-out highway. The Larimer County office of emergency information said an earthen dam in the Big Elk Meadows area southeast of Estes Park gave way and residents of Pinewood Springs and Blue Mountain were ordered to be ready to evacuate.
Read more at http://gazette.com/update-4-7-inches-of-rain-fall-on-boulder-1-dead-cu-boulder-closed/article/1506132#v3yQOmvyfoxcJAFp.99
An estimated 4 to 7 inches of rain fell on Boulder between 7 p.m. Wednesday and 4 a.m. Thursday, National Weather Service meteorologist Jim Kalina to the Daily Camera. Leading up to that, between Monday afternoon and Wednesday evening, weather watchers in parts of Boulder had recorded up to 5 inches of rain. Boerkircher told The Associated Press that one person was killed when a structure collapsed in Jamestown. She said no details were available on the collapsed building. "We're trying to get to Jamestown. A lot of towns need assistance, and we cannot get through," she said. Many roads were closed because of flooding and debris. Coal Creek Canyon northwest of Denver was closed because of a washed-out highway. The Larimer County office of emergency information said an earthen dam in the Big Elk Meadows area southeast of Estes Park gave way and residents of Pinewood Springs and Blue Mountain were ordered to be ready to evacuate.
Read more at http://gazette.com/update-4-7-inches-of-rain-fall-on-boulder-1-dead-cu-boulder-closed/article/1506132#v3yQOmvyfoxcJAFp.99

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., September 12, 2013, 10:30 p.m. – The American Red Cross has closed the evacuation center that was in Manitou Springs, Colo.

An evacuation center remains open at First Presbyterian Church – Weber Street Center located at 105 North Weber St. in Colorado Springs, Colo.

The Red Cross urges all residents to take appropriate emergency actions to protect lives and property. If you are told to evacuate please do so immediately and move to higher ground as quickly as possible. If you are in a multi-level home you should move upstairs to avoid being impacted by flood waters.  If you are stranded in a vehicle you should remain in the vehicle until water recedes or emergency personnel arrive to help you. For more flood safety tips please go online to www.redcross.org/prepare.

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