EMPTY STOCKING FUND: Giving evolves over 30 years of Colorado Springs campaign

By Jakob Rodgers Published: December 24, 2013 | 4:00 pm 0

There weren't cell phones or Facebook updates to get in the way or chores in 1984 for the girls of Cadet Girl Scout Troup 278.

For a week, they worked away at odd jobs - saving all the money they earned, Gazette archives show.

Then they gave it all away.

The means by which people give to The Gazette/El Pomar Empty Stocking Fund have changed dramatically since its inception 30 years ago. Far more people donate to the cause now, and the amounts received are often much larger.

Corporate sponsorhips, company-wide donation drives and thousand-dollar checks are the new normal - part of the reason that the community has donated $409,025 as of Thursday, according to Amy Horton, the Gazette's program manager.

It's been an evolution of giving, said Jerry Bruni, the Bruni Foundation's president, and he's just fine with that.

"We're right in the thick of this season for giving right now," said Bruni, whose foundation matches donations up to $70,000. "This is when the checks really accelerate. This is when the money really comes in.

"These are important times."

The fund commits 100 percent of donations to the people or nonprofits who need them, because The Gazette, the El Pomar Foundation, Wells Fargo and ADD STAFF cover all administrative costs.

That means that every cent of the roughly $14 million raised since 1984 has gone to people in need, organizers say.

As evidenced by the Girl Scouts' donations, giving was smaller and, often, a bit more personal during the fund's inaugural year.

But the ways that people contribute are varied.

For example, the McDivitt Law Firm raised $1,047.15 through an employee raffle and matching donations, said Lisa Bush, McDivitt's marketing director. The law firm received holiday gift baskets from companies it contracts with throughout the year - such as for recycling, advertising and phone directory services - and then asked employees to purchase tickets for certain items in those baskets.

About 100 volunteers brought in $663 earlier this month by simply asking people to put money in stockings at the Festival of Lights Parade, Horton said.

Teachers and students at Mountain Ridge Middle School raised $254 by asking during the school's daily announcements for donations. And the Colorado College hockey team raised about $700 through two separate fundraisers, she said.

Often companies - such as at Dell and Ameriprise Financial - will pledge to match a certain amount of their employees' donations, extending the worth of each offered dollar.

The giving may be slightly less personal during the fund's 30th campaign, but the reason for the giving remains the same, Bruni said. The money will be divided among 15 nonprofit organizations throughout the Pikes Peak region.

"They (nonprofits) are the ones who provide the personal touch to those in need," Bruni said. "That's where the personal touch component takes place."

Comment Policy
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
APR
20
APR
21
APR
22
APR
23
APR
24
APR
25
APR
26
APR
27
APR
28
APR
29
APR
30
MAY
1
MAY
2
MAY
3
Advertisement

Latest Obits view all

Powered by Legacy.com ©