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Costa Rican a celebrity after certified miracle

photo - Costa Rican Floribeth Mora holds up a magazine featuring Pope John Paul II on the cover, as she gives her account of a miracle attributed to John Paul, during a press conference, at the Archbishop's office in San Jose, Costa Rica, Friday, July 5, 2013. Pope Francis on Friday approved the miracle of the Costa Rican woman bringing John Paul to the ranks of saints. Mora suffering from a cerebral aneurism and only given a month to live, was inexplicably cured on May 1, 2011, the date of John Paul's beatification, when millions of worshippers filled St. Peter's Square to honor the beloved Polish pontiff. (AP Photo/Enrigue Martinez) + caption
Costa Rican Floribeth Mora holds up a magazine featuring Pope John Paul II on the cover, as she gives her account of a miracle attributed to John Paul, during a press conference, at the Archbishop's office in San Jose, Costa Rica, Friday, July 5, 2013. Pope Francis on Friday approved the miracle of the Costa Rican woman bringing John Paul to the ranks of saints. Mora suffering from a cerebral aneurism and only given a month to live, was inexplicably cured on May 1, 2011, the date of John Paul's beatification, when millions of worshippers filled St. Peter's Square to honor the beloved Polish pontiff. (AP Photo/Enrigue Martinez)
By Javier Cordoba The Associated Press - Published: April 27, 2014 0

TRES RIOS, Costa Rica - On a warm spring day, Floribeth Mora was in her bed waiting to die from a seemingly inoperable brain aneurysm when her gaze fell upon a photograph of Pope John Paul II in a newspaper.

"Stand up," Mora recalls the image of the pope saying to her. "Don't be afraid."

Mora, her doctors and the Catholic Church say her aneurysm disappeared that day in a miracle that cleared the way for the late pope to be declared a saint Sunday in a ceremony at the Vatican where Mora will be a guest of honor.

For Mora, the church-certified miracle was only the start of her metamorphosis from an ill and desperate woman into an adored symbol of faith for thousands of Costa Ricans and Catholics around the world.

Mora, 50, has been greeting a stream of local and international visitors in her modest home in a middle-class neighborhood outside the Costa Rican capital. The faithful have given her so many letters to deliver to current pontiff Pope Francis that she has had to buy an extra suitcase.

Mora has suspended her late-in-life law studies and much of her work for her family security business to dedicate herself full time to her role as a symbol of faith for many in Costa Rica. "With all of this going on I appreciate having my own business, because if I had a boss, they would have already fired me for missing so much work," she said jokingly.

She says she ignores skeptics who doubt she was healed. "Everyone can think what they want," she told The Associated Press during a visit to her home. "What I know is that I am healthy."

Mora was diagnosed with a brain aneurysm and sent home to rest and take pain medication in April 2011 after doctors said the problem was inoperable. Mora, who thought she was returning home to await death, looked at the image of John Paul on May 1, the day of John Paul's beatification six years after his death.

Then, she says, it spoke to her.

She surprised her family by walking around, and, after her doctors declared her healed, word spread quickly to the local church, and from there to the Vatican.

Today, Mora says speaking about her experience has become her calling.

"I've got so much to do that I'm going to dedicate myself above all to telling the world the story of God's greatness and what it's done for me," she said.

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