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Colorado's Gardner remains opposed to Alabama's Moore

December 6, 2017 Updated: December 6, 2017 at 2:10 pm
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Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., talks with a reporter after leaving the Senate chamber, Friday, Dec. 1, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republican leaders believe they have the votes to approve a GOP overhaul of the tax code. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Jimmy Sengenberger asked Colorado's Sen. Cory Gardner questions about Roy Moore and tax reform on his "Business for Breakfast" show on Denver's Money Talk 1690 Wednesday morning.

While President Trump and the Republican National Committee has gotten behind Moore in the Senate race in Alabama next week, Gardner has not, he said on the radio show.

"Nothing has changed, nothing will change," said Gardner, who has opposed Moore (and Trump) before.

Moore, of course, is the former elected state Supreme Court justice who was removed from office twice for failing to follow the law instead of his religious beliefs. He has been accused by nine women of trying to have relations with them when they were in their teens and he was in his 30s as a prosecutor in Alabama in the 1970s. Moore has been accused of fondling a girl as young as 14 and attempting to molest one who was 16.

He allegedly was banned from a local mall, where people remembered he would try to pick up teen girls. Moore has denied the allegations and characterized the claims as an orchestrated political hit job, despite mounting evidence and corroborations of the women's claims.

Gardner's opinion is significant because he chairs the National Republican Senatorial Committee, the political effort to elect Republicans to the U.S. Senate. Gardner has gone so far as to say if Moore wins next Tuesday, he would move to expel Moore from the Senate.

"The National Republican Senatorial Campaign will remain in same position," Gardner told Sengenberger Wednesday. "We will not be participating in the Senate race, and I keep my same position and my same commitment that I made some time ago as it relates to that."

Sengenberger, who leads the conservative Millennial Policy Center and the Liberty Day Institute, replied, "I appreciate that stand, I must say."

The pair went on to discuss the Senate tax reform bill that passed last weekend.

Sengenberger pointed out that the tax cuts for business in the Senate bill are permanent, but the cuts for individuals expire in 2026.

Gardner said the bill would create 1 million jobs by bringing back employers to the United States, and by creating competition for workers the bill would jumpstart stagnant U.S. wages. Critics say that's wishful thinking.

"This makes us competitive again," Gardner said.

He said a future Congress would have to decide whether to raise taxes on individuals by letting the cuts expire.

"My guess is they'll keep the tax cuts in place." Gardner told Sengenberger.

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