Colorado Springs police move in to protect nesting owls

By: Kassondra Cloos kassondra.cloos@gazette.com
May 4, 2013 Updated: May 4, 2013 at 7:20 pm
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photo - Snow flies as baby Great Horned Owls peer from their nest in the Mountain Shadows area Wednesday, May 1, 2013. Hundreds of people have been stopping to view the owlets at the corner of Centennial Boulevard and Flying W Ranch Road but Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokesman Michael Seraphin is cautioning viewers to keep their distance. "The parents can be protective of the nest and may dive-bomb pedestrians," he said. The tree is adjacent to the parking lot of a Walgreens and store employees there are also concerned about activity around the nest and are suggesting viewers not get closer than 100 feet to the owlets. Photo by Mark Reis, The Gazette
Snow flies as baby Great Horned Owls peer from their nest in the Mountain Shadows area Wednesday, May 1, 2013. Hundreds of people have been stopping to view the owlets at the corner of Centennial Boulevard and Flying W Ranch Road but Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokesman Michael Seraphin is cautioning viewers to keep their distance. "The parents can be protective of the nest and may dive-bomb pedestrians," he said. The tree is adjacent to the parking lot of a Walgreens and store employees there are also concerned about activity around the nest and are suggesting viewers not get closer than 100 feet to the owlets. Photo by Mark Reis, The Gazette 

Throngs of people flocking to view baby great horned owls have been causing traffic headaches and Colorado Springs Police say enough is enough.

The family of owls is nesting near the Mountain Shadows neighborhood and there have been many reports of people climbing the tree to get a better view.

It's not a good idea and endangers both the spectators and the birds, according to Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

The police department announced Saturday it has put up official barricades to deter people from disturbing the birds.

'People are standing in the middle of the street, ' said Lt. Catherine Buckley. 'People are not using good common sense. '

The police department has warned that uncooperative pedestrians may find themselves slammed with tickets for obstructing traffic.

Great horned owls are not listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Colorado Springs police move in to protect nesting owls

By: Kassondra Cloos kassondra.cloos@gazette.com
Published: May 4, 2013

Throngs of people flocking to view baby great horned owls have been causing traffic headaches and Colorado Springs Police say enough is enough. The family of owls is nesting near the Mountain Shadows neighborhood and there have been many reports of people climbing the tree to get a better...

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