Colorado Springs News, Sports & Business

Gazette Premium Content Colorado on the Web: Volunteers needed to protect baby eagle

By Dalton Walker Updated: June 30, 2014 at 3:57 pm

While most people will celebrate our country's birthday on Fourth of July weekend by grilling food with family and friends, a few brave souls will be guarding the symbol of America near one Colorado city.

There's still room to join them.

The Raptor Education Foundation of Brighton needs help to watch over a baby bald eagle in case the bird takes flight over the holiday weekend and falls on a nearby highway.

Not many people can say they guarded America's symbol on America's birthday. That's almost resume material, and 24 volunteers are needed for shifts around the clock. Are you up for the task? Kudos go out to volunteers who have already accepted the challenge.

The eaglet hatched recently, and the bird's nest is in a tree roughly 100 yards from E-470 in Commerce City, according to a YourHub article published Wednesday on Denverpost.com.

"If it flies off to the west or the southwest, it's going to go right over the highway," Raptor Education Foundation Director Peter Reshetniak told YourHub. "And if it's a typical first flight, it could lead to disaster."

The bird is expected to leave the nest for the first time between July 3 and July 6.

Guard duty with the "Eagle Brigade" doesn't sound like a tough task. It's more like a time-consuming public service watch. Still, the watch needs to take place for the safety of America. OK, it's not that dramatic, but the bird needs your help.

Volunteers will watch the nest from afar for the four days, and if the bird takes a dive into the ground, or, God forbid, lands on the highway, they will immediately call Reshetniak's team. Federal law forbids people to touch a bald eagle without a permit. Also, it's probably not a good idea to try to hold a wild animal or run on the highway and attempt to stop traffic if the bird falls.

Although eaglets do what they want - like most babies - the species typically doesn't take its first flight at night, Reshetniak said. Most of the watch needs to be done in the early morning or late afternoon. Stock up on snacks, water, sunscreen and a car cellphone charger and I'm sure the time will breeze by.

To volunteer, send an email to raptor2@usaref.org with times and days you're available, or call (303) 680-8500.

If you volunteer, share your experience with Colorado on the Web. I can be reached at dalton.walker@gazette.com.

- - -

The Web wizards at the popular Movoto blog posted a fun list with a local angle of 45 things you probably didn't know about Colorado Springs. Some of the list is new to me, but I haven't lived here long. And some of the list is pretty silly, or spooky.

I heard that "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" was set in Colorado but didn't know it was set in the Springs. Good show. That's No. 34.

Colorado Springs was named the most pet-friendly city by Forbes in 2014 and the best city for dogs in Men's Health magazine. My dog probably agrees with that. I have a beagle, and he loves going out for most hikes.

Colorado Springs gets 300 days of sunshine a year? It sure feels like it sometimes, doesn't it? Well, for most mornings anyway. Apparently, a publicist for a railroad company pushed the 300 days of sunshine to lure travelers way back when, according to Movoto.

A ghost allegedly roams Evergreen Cemetery and the Pioneers Museum. Is it the same ghost? Possibly.

To see the full list, visit my blog at blogs.gazette.com/ontheweb.

-

Have a Colorado on the Web idea? Send me an email to dalton.walker@gazette.com or tweet @GazetteDalton.

Comment Policy

Our commenting system has changed. Please register or login with your gazette.com account to comment on a story. Click here for information.

You've reached 4 FREE premium stories this month

Simply register to continue. It's free.

Register Learn more

Already registered? Click here to login.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
SEP
22
SEP
23
SEP
24
SEP
25
SEP
26
SEP
27
SEP
28
SEP
29
SEP
30
OCT
1
OCT
2
OCT
3
OCT
4
OCT
5
Advertisement