Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

Boulder issuing more same-sex marriage licenses

By: Ivan Moreno, Associated Press
June 26, 2014 Updated: June 26, 2014 at 9:06 pm
0
Caption +
Michelle and Wendy Alfredsen with their son Oliver kiss after getting their marriage license at the Boulder County Clerk and Recorders Office in Boulder Colo. Wednesday, June 25, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken)

BOULDER — More same-sex couples lined up to get marriage licenses in Boulder County Thursday despite warnings that gay marriage remains illegal in Colorado.

Clerk Hillary Hall began issuing licenses Wednesday after a federal appeals court ruled that Utah's same-sex marriage ban was unconstitutional. More couples showed up Thursday to get licenses and some said they were quickly married by simply signing their certificates, a process allowed under Colorado law.

However, Colorado Attorney General John Suthers, legal analysts and even the lawyer challenging Colorado's gay marriage ban, say Hall's actions aren't legal because the ruling is on hold in case of a possible appeal. The ruling has no legal impact until the case is settled, so Utah's ban is still in place and so is Colorado's.

"I think what the Boulder Clerk and Recorder is doing is quite unlawful under Colorado law," said Ralph Ogden, who represents a lesbian couple suing to overturn Colorado's gay marriage ban. "You know what side I'm on, and I'd like to say everything is OK, but from the legal side it isn't."

Some of the couples getting licenses in Boulder said they went to support Hall's decision to flout the court's stay and also wanted to act before Suthers moved to halt the process. The clerk's office said it had issued 32 licenses on Thursday.

"It really is just about time, and you know, the world is changing and there's no reason for us not to do it today," said Felice Cohen, who got a license to marry Jennifer Knight of Longmont. The two were joined in a civil union in May.

Some thought they would have to wait a few more years to get married in Colorado but others, like Angie Holley, 61, and Bylo Farmer, 53, said they never thought it would happen in their lifetime.

Holley and Farmer, among those signed their marriage license to "self-solemnize" their union, were joined by friends from their women's chorus who sang "Going To The Chapel" before and after they got their license. They had an impromptu reception a picnic table outside the clerk's office with sparkling grape juice, with friends sharing stories about them.

Farmer said that for now she's not worried about warnings that the licenses aren't valid.

"I'm not going to let it ruin my day. I've got my friends and loved ones here," Farmer said.

Levi Healy, 34, and Josh Hufford, 31, of Denver, who had planned to go to California to get married, said their friends and family encouraged them to get a marriage license after Hall's announcement. They said Suther's warning helped them to decide to act now.

They both described the experience as "surreal."

"It still feels fuzzy, and 'Is this really happening?' but yes, it really is," Hufford said.

Boulder County was among the first to issue same-sex marriage licenses nearly 40 years ago. Six couples were issued licenses by then-clerk Clela Rorex in 1975 before the state attorney general intervened.

All six couples were married. The first couple divorced. One of the other couples, Anthony Sullivan, an Australian citizen, and Richard Adams, of California remained together until Adams' death in 2012. Their marriage wasn't recognized by the federal government and their story, including Sullivan's fight for a green card, is chronicled in the new documentary "Limited Partnership."

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Incognito Mode Your browser is in Incognito mode

You vanished!

We welcome you to read all of our stories by signing into your account. If you don't have a subscription, please subscribe today for daily award winning journalism.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

or
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 
This is your last FREE article for the month
This is your last FREE article for the month

Subscribe now and enjoy Unlimited Digital Access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?

 
You have reached your article limit for the month
You have reached your article limit for the month

We hope that you've enjoyed your complimentary access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 

Exclusive Subscriber Content

You read The Gazette because you care about your community and the local stories you can't find anywhere else.

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber? Get Access | Already a digital subscriber? Log In
 
articles remaining
×
Thank you for your interest in local journalism.
Gain unlimited access, 50% fewer ads and a faster browsing experience.