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Author:

Rachel Riley

News Local and Breaking news

Rachel Riley covers local and breaking news. The recent Boston University graduate joined The Gazette's staff after interning at the newspaper in Summer 2016. During her undergraduate career, she held part-time positions at two New England newspapers, an investigative journalism nonprofit and an environmental magazine based in Auckland, New Zealand.

Community Solar Power
El Paso County commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to grant a rezoning necessary for the construction of the Front Range-Midway Solar Energy Project, a roughly 1,100-acre solar energy farm planned for south of the Pikes Peak International Raceway and east of Fort Carson. AP file photo.
Fort Carson soldiers are honored Wednesday, July 9, 2014, before the start of the first night of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo at the Norris-Penrose Event Center in Colorado Springs. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)
Fountain City Council voted unanimously to create a program that will allow family members to purchase a banner to honor an immediate family member that is currently serving on active duty in any branch of the United States Armed Forces. Gazette file photo by Christian Murdock.
The view from U.S. Highway 115 shows the hill, behind the sign, where the Hitch Rack Ranch rock quarry would be built behind. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)
Recycling programs
Chemical Waste Technician Harry Herriges, left, helps Joe Bricker unload a truck filled with hazardous household items. People steadily dropped by the El Paso County Household Hazardous Waste Facility at 3255 Akers Drive on Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011 to drop off their hazardous material. The facility has been seeing dozens of drop-offs on a daily basis. The county's recycling programs had a banner year in 2010. Gazette, Bryan Oller
Noel Sawyer (Photo via Woodland Park website)
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Jake Bywater walks through the remains Wednesday, April 18, 2018, of his 30-foot by 60-foot pole barn that burned in the 117 Fire. Bywater spent the night and day fighting the fire and putting out hot spots. Bywater saved his home but lost the barn, school bus, four boats and the 100-year-old homestead that he and his wife, Kim, had restored. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)
Eryn Maggard cradles a two-week old goat who lost it's mother in the 117 Fire on Wednesday, April 19, 2018. She carried the kid named Washington around all day, because every time she put him down, the goat would bleat for his mother. Maggard and her husband operate Sugar Snap Ranch in the Hanover area, a ranch that takes in rescued farm animals. On Tuesday, when the fire raged towards them, the Maggards had 3-4 minutes to get as many animals out as possible. They saved many, but a number of their pot-bellied pigs and goats perished in some of the burned structures. The young goat is named Washington, but Maggard's children have nicknamed it Toasty. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)
Jake Bywater walks through the remains Wednesday, April 18, 2018, of his 30-foot by 60-foot pole barn that burned in the 117 Fire. Bywater spent the night and day fighting the fire and putting out hot spots. Bywater saved his home but lost the barn, school bus, four boats and the 100-year-old homestead that he and his wife, Kim, had restored. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)