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RAW REVIVAL: Chef preaches goodness of uncooked food

By: TERESA FARNEY
May 18, 2010
0
photo - Martine Purdy holds a falafel and hummus plate Tuesday, May 4, 2010. at Venue 515 in Manitou Springs. In the background is the painting "Sodom and Gomorrah by artist Bill Hyer.  Photo by Photo by Mark Reis, The Gazette
Martine Purdy holds a falafel and hummus plate Tuesday, May 4, 2010. at Venue 515 in Manitou Springs. In the background is the painting "Sodom and Gomorrah by artist Bill Hyer. Photo by Photo by Mark Reis, The Gazette 

Martine Purdy massages kale leaves when preparing them as an ingredient, soaks seeds and nuts before eating them, and instead of adding cheese to lasagna and pizza, she whips up red bell pepper-avocado-almond “cheese” or a creamy dill-avocado “cheese” as a substitute.

The thread that links these is that they’re raw foods and are part of a diet that stays away from processed or packaged food. And Purdy, owner of Chevy Lee Raw Foods, has become an expert at making uncooked food combinations at her business, which is just a few months old.

It’s the culmination of her experimenting with raw food that began about four years ago when she began preparing foods for Rick Laurenzi. He was on a raw food diet for weight management and cancer prevention. Purdy found she liked the foods she was discovering and saw an interest in people who liked to eat this type of diet but didn’t necessarily like to do all the preparation. Voilà! Her business was the result

Proponents of such diets are called raw foodists. Their meals consist of 75 percent to 100 percent uncooked food. Raw foodists say cooking kills enzymes in food that help with healthy digestion and that raw foods increase energy and prevent diseases.

“The basis of the diet is using fresh fruits, vegetables, nuts and only grains that are gluten-free,” she said. “The actual temperature at which foods cook is highly debated. Some say 105 degrees, some 109 degrees, some 118 degrees. There hasn’t really been a lot of official research done in that area, just a lot of opinions. So I set my dehydrator at 110 degrees.”

Purdy relies on a food dehydrator, a blender (Vitamix), a juicer, a food processor and “really sharp knives,” she said, to prepare her raw food recipes.

“To add crunchy texture to some dishes, I massage oil into kale leaves to soften them. Then I rub the leaves with a little agave nectar and dehydrate them to make the leaves crispy.”

A good example of how she uses raw foods to make a delightful dish is her cucumber-avocado-dill pizza (pictured) which I saw her make. The crust of the pizza is made by soaking pumpkin seeds to release their acid and make them easier to digest. Then they’re blended with buckwheat to make a dough. The dough rounds are dehydrated to make a cracker-like crust. She blends avocado and dill to make a “cheese” spread that she smoothes over the crust, and tops that with sliced cucumber, avocado, red bell pepper, walnuts and crispy kale. The finished dish is colorful and tasty.

Is preparing raw food hard?

“It’s not hard,” she said, “just different. It’s a whole different process.”

Laurenzi, who has lost more than 150 pounds on a raw food diet and self-produced the weight-loss film “Dropping a Ton and Making it Fun,” is a purist in his approach to the raw food diet.

“The diet is more than just a raw food diet. It’s an alkaline diet. I stay away from high sugar fruits and high acid foods,” he said. “There are a lot of raw food cookbooks, but you have to be careful about the sugars.”

That’s why he plans to write 10 recipe books over the next 15 years.

“I’m almost ready to print the first edition, ‘Ricky’s Rocket Fuel,’” he said. “It has recipes for dishes that are commonly embraced by this country: pizzas and burgers.”

Ashley Kipp, a pilates instructor and nutritionist, recommended the diet, too. “I think one of the greatest benefits of a raw diet is that it really focuses you to eliminate the junk (in your diet) and focuses on eating clean, whole foods,” she said.

For Angela Thompson, a raw food coach and frequent customer of Chevy Lee Raw Foods, it’s about the difference live foods can make in her life.

“For me, it’s meant having more energy, more focus, more freedom in getting to my ideal weight, fewer aches and pains, more zest for life and more freedom to follow my dreams,” she e-mailed. “Live foods have helped me be the ‘me’ I was created to be. I’ll be 63 in a few days and feel more fully alive than ever — in spirit, soul and body.”

Thompson pointed out that this is a great time of year to get started, with lots of fresh organic produce coming available soon — especially with farmers markets starting up in the near future.

“The easiest way to get started on a raw food diet is to add more fruit and veggies,” she said. “The more life-giving food you eat the more you want and the less you crave those things that rob you of optimal health. Start your day with a life-giving juice or smoothie. Take a class and discover new life-giving favorites — it’s not just salads.”

Call Farney at 636-0271. Hear her KVOR Table Talk noon to 1 p.m. Saturdays on 740 AM.

 

 

want more?

If you’re interested in exploring the world of raw foodists here a few ways to get started.

• Raw Fusion Dinners hosted by Chevy Lee Raw Foods, held the third Thursday of the month at Canvas Café at Venue 515, 515 Manitou Ave. in Manitou Springs. Call 685-1861 ext. 11, thebac.org.

• Chevy Lee Raw Foods, for catering and take-out. Call 205-4639.

• Angela Thompson, raw food coach. Call 282-1702.

• Rick Laurenzi, cancer and diabetes coach,
rick@droppingaton.com.

 

 

RECIPES

 

Cucumber-avocado-dill Pizza

Yield: Makes 6 personal pizzas

CRUST
1 cup buckwheat groats, soaked
 1 hour, then drained
1 cup pumpkin seeds, soaked
 1 hour, then rinsed
1

4 cup ground flax
1/2 lemon, peeled
1/2 cup water
Pinch salt and pepper

 SAUCE
1 cup almonds
1/2 cup pumpkin seeds
1/2 cup water
1 avocado
1 cup cashews
2 green onions
3 tablespoons nutritional yeast
2 tablespoons Braggs liquid
 amino acids (soy sauce
 substitute)
1/2 cup chopped fresh dill
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon onion salt

TOPPINGS
36 slices cucumber, peeled into stripes (about 1 cucumber)
1 avocado, chopped
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup sweet-and-sour crispy kale
 (see recipe)

Procedure:

To make the crust, combine all crust ingredients in food processor. Process until smooth and doughlike. Using about 1

2 cup of dough per crust, spread each ball of dough into a circle on a dehydrator tray lined with a teflex sheet. Dehydrate at 110 degrees 2 hours. Flip onto another tray without a teflexcqk sheet and dehydrate another 4-6 hours. Set aside or refrigerate.

To make the sauce, combine all sauce ingredients in food processor. Process until smooth. Spread 1

2 cup sauce on each crust.

Top with 6 slices cucumber, avocado chunks, chopped red bell pepper, walnuts and crispy kale.

Source: Martine Prudy, owner of Chevy Lee Raw Foods

 

 

Sweet-and-Sour Crispy Kale

Yield: Makes about 4 cups

1 bunch kale, cut into
 ribbons
1

4 cup olive oil
1 teaspoon sea salt
Dash black pepper
Juice from 1/2 lemon
 1 tablespoon agave nectar

Procedure:

Place kale in bowl. Add olive oil and toss to coat. Add salt, pepper and lemon juice. Massage kale 1-2 minutes, or until it starts to soften. Add agave nectar and massage another minute.

Spread kale onto dehydrator tray. Dehydrate at 110 degrees about 4 hours, or until crispy. Store in sealed container in refrigerator up to 1 month.

Source: Martine Prudy, owner of Chevy Lee Raw Foods

Date-Nut Torte

Yield: 6-8 servings

1 cup filberts (hazelnuts)
1 cup raisins
1

2 cup pitted dates
1-1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
1 cup pecans
1 cup currants

Procedure:

In food processor fitted with the “S” blade, blend filberts and raisins into a fine meal. On a nice serving plate, press mixture into round shape about 1

2-inch thick and 5 inches in diameter. Clean out food processor.

To make a lemon date frosting, add dates and lemon juice to food processor and blend until smooth. You may need to add some water to thin. When smooth and spreadable, stir lemon rind into frosting. Clean out food processor.

Frost top of first layer of torte with 1

3 frosting and set the rest aside.

In food processor, blend pecans and currants into a fine meal. Place on another small plate and form into a 5-inch round layer to fit on top of first layer. Carefully place on top of frosted layer. Frost top and entire outside of torte.

Serve, or chill up to three days.

Source: Michelle Mukatis, owner of Cultivate Health

 

Martine Purdy massages kale leaves when preparing them as an ingredient, soaks seeds and nuts before eating them, and instead of adding cheese to lasagna and pizza, she whips up red bell pepper-avocado-almond “cheese” or a creamy dill-avocado “cheese” as a substitute.

The thread that links these is that they’re raw foods and are part of a diet that stays away from processed or packaged food. And Purdy, owner of Chevy Lee Raw Foods, has become an expert at making uncooked food combinations at her business, which is just a few months old.

It’s the culmination of her experimenting with raw food that began about four years ago when she began preparing foods for Rick Laurenzi. He was on a raw food diet for weight management and cancer prevention. Purdy found she liked the foods she was discovering and saw an interest in people who liked to eat this type of diet but didn’t necessarily like to do all the preparation. Voilà! Her business was the result

Proponents of such diets are called raw foodists. Their meals consist of 75 percent to 100 percent uncooked food. Raw foodists say cooking kills enzymes in food that help with healthy digestion and that raw foods increase energy and prevent diseases.

“The basis of the diet is using fresh fruits, vegetables, nuts and only grains that are gluten-free,” she said. “The actual temperature at which foods cook is highly debated. Some say 105 degrees, some 109 degrees, some 118 degrees. There hasn’t really been a lot of official research done in that area, just a lot of opinions. So I set my dehydrator at 110 degrees.”

Purdy relies on a food dehydrator, a blender (Vitamix), a juicer, a food processor and “really sharp knives,” she said, to prepare her raw food recipes.

“To add crunchy texture to some dishes, I massage oil into kale leaves to soften them. Then I rub the leaves with a little agave nectar and dehydrate them to make the leaves crispy.”

A good example of how she uses raw foods to make a delightful dish is her cucumber-avocado-dill pizza (pictured) which I saw her make. The crust of the pizza is made by soaking pumpkin seeds to release their acid and make them easier to digest. Then they’re blended with buckwheat to make a dough. The dough rounds are dehydrated to make a cracker-like crust. She blends avocado and dill to make a “cheese” spread that she smoothes over the crust, and tops that with sliced cucumber, avocado, red bell pepper, walnuts and crispy kale. The finished dish is colorful and tasty.

Is preparing raw food hard?

“It’s not hard,” she said, “just different. It’s a whole different process.”

Laurenzi, who has lost more than 150 pounds on a raw food diet and self-produced the weight-loss film “Dropping a Ton and Making it Fun,” is a purist in his approach to the raw food diet.

“The diet is more than just a raw food diet. It’s an alkaline diet. I stay away from high sugar fruits and high acid foods,” he said. “There are a lot of raw food cookbooks, but you have to be careful about the sugars.”

That’s why he plans to write 10 recipe books over the next 15 years.

“I’m almost ready to print the first edition, ‘Ricky’s Rocket Fuel,’” he said. “It has recipes for dishes that are commonly embraced by this country: pizzas and burgers.”

Ashley Kipp, a pilates instructor and nutritionist, recommended the diet, too. “I think one of the greatest benefits of a raw diet is that it really focuses you to eliminate the junk (in your diet) and focuses on eating clean, whole foods,” she said.

For Angela Thompson, a raw food coach and frequent customer of Chevy Lee Raw Foods, it’s about the difference live foods can make in her life.

“For me, it’s meant having more energy, more focus, more freedom in getting to my ideal weight, fewer aches and pains, more zest for life and more freedom to follow my dreams,” she e-mailed. “Live foods have helped me be the ‘me’ I was created to be. I’ll be 63 in a few days and feel more fully alive than ever — in spirit, soul and body.”

Thompson pointed out that this is a great time of year to get started, with lots of fresh organic produce coming available soon — especially with farmers markets starting up in the near future.

“The easiest way to get started on a raw food diet is to add more fruit and veggies,” she said. “The more life-giving food you eat the more you want and the less you crave those things that rob you of optimal health. Start your day with a life-giving juice or smoothie. Take a class and discover new life-giving favorites — it’s not just salads.”

Call Farney at 636-0271. Hear her KVOR Table Talk noon to 1 p.m. Saturdays on 740 AM.

 

 

want more?

If you’re interested in exploring the world of raw foodists here a few ways to get started.

• Raw Fusion Dinners hosted by Chevy Lee Raw Foods, held the third Thursday of the month at Canvas Café at Venue 515, 515 Manitou Ave. in Manitou Springs. Call 685-1861 ext. 11, thebac.org.

• Chevy Lee Raw Foods, for catering and take-out. Call 205-4639.

• Angela Thompson, raw food coach. Call 282-1702.

• Rick Laurenzi, cancer and diabetes coach,
rick@droppingaton.com.

 

 

RECIPES

 

Cucumber-avocado-dill Pizza

Yield: Makes 6 personal pizzas

CRUST
1 cup buckwheat groats, soaked
 1 hour, then drained
1 cup pumpkin seeds, soaked
 1 hour, then rinsed
1

4 cup ground flax
1/2 lemon, peeled
1/2 cup water
Pinch salt and pepper

 SAUCE
1 cup almonds
1/2 cup pumpkin seeds
1/2 cup water
1 avocado
1 cup cashews
2 green onions
3 tablespoons nutritional yeast
2 tablespoons Braggs liquid
 amino acids (soy sauce
 substitute)
1/2 cup chopped fresh dill
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon onion salt

TOPPINGS
36 slices cucumber, peeled into stripes (about 1 cucumber)
1 avocado, chopped
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup sweet-and-sour crispy kale
 (see recipe)

Procedure:

To make the crust, combine all crust ingredients in food processor. Process until smooth and doughlike. Using about 1

2 cup of dough per crust, spread each ball of dough into a circle on a dehydrator tray lined with a teflex sheet. Dehydrate at 110 degrees 2 hours. Flip onto another tray without a teflexcqk sheet and dehydrate another 4-6 hours. Set aside or refrigerate.

To make the sauce, combine all sauce ingredients in food processor. Process until smooth. Spread 1

2 cup sauce on each crust.

Top with 6 slices cucumber, avocado chunks, chopped red bell pepper, walnuts and crispy kale.

Source: Martine Prudy, owner of Chevy Lee Raw Foods

 

 

Sweet-and-Sour Crispy Kale

Yield: Makes about 4 cups

1 bunch kale, cut into
 ribbons
1

4 cup olive oil
1 teaspoon sea salt
Dash black pepper
Juice from 1/2 lemon
 1 tablespoon agave nectar

Procedure:

Place kale in bowl. Add olive oil and toss to coat. Add salt, pepper and lemon juice. Massage kale 1-2 minutes, or until it starts to soften. Add agave nectar and massage another minute.

Spread kale onto dehydrator tray. Dehydrate at 110 degrees about 4 hours, or until crispy. Store in sealed container in refrigerator up to 1 month.

Source: Martine Prudy, owner of Chevy Lee Raw Foods

Date-Nut Torte

Yield: 6-8 servings

1 cup filberts (hazelnuts)
1 cup raisins
1

2 cup pitted dates
1-1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
1 cup pecans
1 cup currants

Procedure:

In food processor fitted with the “S” blade, blend filberts and raisins into a fine meal. On a nice serving plate, press mixture into round shape about 1

2-inch thick and 5 inches in diameter. Clean out food processor.

To make a lemon date frosting, add dates and lemon juice to food processor and blend until smooth. You may need to add some water to thin. When smooth and spreadable, stir lemon rind into frosting. Clean out food processor.

Frost top of first layer of torte with 1

3 frosting and set the rest aside.

In food processor, blend pecans and currants into a fine meal. Place on another small plate and form into a 5-inch round layer to fit on top of first layer. Carefully place on top of frosted layer. Frost top and entire outside of torte.

Serve, or chill up to three days.

Source: Michelle Mukatis, owner of Cultivate Health

 

 

 

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