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Protests, new climate pledges after Trump's Paris pullout

By: LORNE COOK and FRANK JORDANS , Associated Press
June 2, 2017 Updated: June 2, 2017 at 6:45 am
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This photo dated Thursday, June 1, 2017 shows the City Hall of Paris, France, illuminated in green following the announcement by US President Donald Trump that the United States will withdraw from the 2015 Paris accord and try to negotiate a new global deal on climate change. (AP Photo/Nadine Achoui-Lesage)

BRUSSELS — Environmental campaigners staged protests Friday against President Donald Trump's decision to pull the United States out of the Paris climate accord, while other nations pledged to double down on their efforts to curb global warming in response to the U.S. move.

In Berlin, Greenpeace activists projected Trump's silhouette onto the side of the U.S. embassy along with the words "#TotalLoser, so sad!"

APTOPIX Germany US Trump Climate
A Greenpeace banner showing U.S. President Donald Trump and the slogan '#TotalLoser, so sad!' is projected onto the facade of the U.S. Embassy in Berlin, Germany, Friday, June 2, 2017. Trump declared Thursday he was pulling the U.S. from the landmark Paris climate agreement, striking a major blow to worldwide efforts to combat global warming and distancing the country from its closest allies abroad. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn) 

Hours later German Chancellor Angela Merkel summoned reporters for an impromptu statement in which she called Trump's decision "extremely regrettable and that's putting it very mildly."

But Merkel, whose country hosts this year's international climate summit, said it was now time to look ahead.

"This decision can't and won't stop all those of us who feel obliged to protect the planet," she said. "On the contrary. We in Germany, Europe and the world will combine our forces more resolutely than ever to address and successfully tackle challenges for humanity such as climate change."

Anticipating a possible U.S. pullout, officials from China and the European Union — two of the world's major polluters — had prepared a declaration reaffirming their commitment to the 2015 Paris Agreement, which is widely considered a landmark deal for bringing together almost all countries under a common goal.

Climate issues were expected to dominate discussions Friday between Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, who is leading a large delegation of ministers to Brussels, and EU Council President Donald Tusk and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

Speaking to European business leaders alongside Li, Juncker said EU-China ties are underpinned by "a rules-based international system."

Brussels and Beijing believe in "the full implementation, without nuances, of the Paris climate agreement," Juncker said, and underlined that there can be "no backsliding."

European heavyweights France, Germany and Italy said in a joint statement on Thursday that they regretted Trump's decision to withdraw from the accord, while affirming their "strongest commitment" to implement its measures.

Belgium Europe China
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, right, gestures as he walks with European Council President Donald Tusk prior to a meeting at the Europa building in Brussels on Thursday, June 1, 2017. (Olivier Hoslet, Pool Photo via AP) 

While Trump said the United States would be willing to rejoin the accord if it could obtain more favorable terms, the three European leaders said the agreement cannot be renegotiated, "since it is a vital instrument for our planet, societies and economics."

Germany's environment minister, Barbara Hendricks, told reporters in Berlin that other countries will fill the leadership vacuum but none will be expected to make up the shortfall in emissions reductions caused by Washington's exit.

Hendricks said the absence of $500 million contributions from the United States to the Green Climate Fund will be felt from 2018, but suggested the gap could be filled with "other financing mechanisms, for example through the World Bank."

The Green Fund is designed to help poor countries adapt to climate change and bypass some of the heavily polluting technologies formerly used by rich countries.

Poor countries are predicted to be among the hardest hit by global warming, with some predicting tens of millions of "climate refugees" in coming decades.

The leader of the country to next hold the rotating presidency of the European Union called Trump's decision "very bad, very negative."

Estonian Prime Minister Juri Ratas told The Associated Press that the Paris accord "was, and still is a very important goal to achieve."

A top atmospheric scientist at the U.N.'s weather agency said Friday that the "worst-case scenario" caused by the planned U.S. pullout from the Paris climate deal would be a further 0.3-degree Celsius (0.5 Fahrenheit) rise in global temperatures by 2100.

Deon Terblanche of the World Meteorological Organization said the organization hasn't run any new scientific models following Trump's announcement.

The Paris accord aims to prevent average temperature around the world from heating up by more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) before the end of the century, compared to before the start of the industrial age.

Scientists say every fraction of a degree change in average temperatures can lead to noticeable swings in local weather patterns, though exact consequences are difficult to predict.

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Jordans contributed to this report from Berlin. Jamey Keaten in Geneva and Raf Casert in Tallinn, Estonia, contributed.

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