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Marines, Ospreys head to Carson for training

By: JAKOB RODGERS
April 5, 2013
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photo - U.S. Marine Corps parachutists free fall from an MV-22 Osprey at 10,000 feet above the drop zone at Fort A.P. Hill, Va. on Jan. 17, 2000.  The Marines from the 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C., became the first to deploy from the Osprey.  Twenty-four successful jumps were recorded under the supervision of the U.S. Army Operational Test Command and the Marine Corps Systems Command to qualify the V-22 for parachute service.  Photo by  DoD photo by Vernon Pugh, U.S. Navy.  (Released)
U.S. Marine Corps parachutists free fall from an MV-22 Osprey at 10,000 feet above the drop zone at Fort A.P. Hill, Va. on Jan. 17, 2000. The Marines from the 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C., became the first to deploy from the Osprey. Twenty-four successful jumps were recorded under the supervision of the U.S. Army Operational Test Command and the Marine Corps Systems Command to qualify the V-22 for parachute service. Photo by DoD photo by Vernon Pugh, U.S. Navy. (Released) 

A half-dozen of one of the military’s most versatile aircraft will soon visit Fort Carson.

About 40 Marines will begin a 10-day training cycle at Fort Carson on Tuesday to test each pilot’s skills and their MV-22B Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft against the region’s thin air, according to a release by Fort Carson.

Six of the aircraft are expected to carry out training exercises down range at Fort Carson and at the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site.

The Osprey’s wings have helicopter-like rotors that can tilt, and they can take off vertically and can fly faster than a helicopter.

The training cycle is the second visit by a group of Ospreys in less than a year to Fort Carson — a popular training post for aviation units preparing to deploy to Afghanistan.

In September, eight of the aircraft and 200 Marines trained at Fort Carson and Piñon Canyon.

Army helicopter units also routinely visit the post to conduct high-altitude training exercises at landing zones in near Leadville.

The latest group of visiting helicopters — from Fort Riley, Kan. — will train at the post through May 29.

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