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Post, Guardian win Pulitzers for NSA revelations

By: Associated Press
April 14, 2014 Updated: April 14, 2014 at 1:44 pm
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photo - FILE - A Sunday, June 9, 2013, file photo provided by The Guardian newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the U.S. National Security Agency, in Hong Kong. A report that revealed the massive U.S. government surveillance effort is among the top finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. The stories were based on thousands of documents handed over by Snowden. The reports were published by Barton Gellman of The Washington Post and Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Ewan MacAskill of The Guardian. (AP Photo/The Guardian, File)
FILE - A Sunday, June 9, 2013, file photo provided by The Guardian newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the U.S. National Security Agency, in Hong Kong. A report that revealed the massive U.S. government surveillance effort is among the top finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. The stories were based on thousands of documents handed over by Snowden. The reports were published by Barton Gellman of The Washington Post and Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Ewan MacAskill of The Guardian. (AP Photo/The Guardian, File) 

NEW YORK — The Washington Post and The Guardian won the Pulitzer Prize in public service Monday for revealing the U.S. government's sweeping surveillance efforts in stories based on thousands of secret documents handed over by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.

The Pulitzer for breaking news was awarded to The Boston Globe for its coverage of the deadly Boston Marathon bombing.

The awards are American journalism's highest honor.

The winning entries about the NSA's spy programs showed the government has collected information about millions of Americans' phone calls and emails based on its classified interpretations of laws passed after the Sept. 11 attacks.

The disclosures touched off a furious debate in the U.S. over privacy versus security and led President Barack Obama to impose limits on the surveillance.

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