LETTERS: Turmoil; tail wagging the dog; State of the Union

ltr Updated: February 17, 2013 at 12:00 am • Published: February 17, 2013

The tail wagging the dog

C’mon, gimme a break, 15 years for cutting off a beard? I heard about this case a year ago when these nefarious villains were rounded up and jailed. Then and now I still consider it to be one of the most ridiculous things I’d ever heard in my life — not to mention over 40 years in law enforcement. Our society and its need for being politically correct are at the root of these things. We can’t offend anyone, even an insular society such as the Amish. They would have taken care of this themselves, but no, the government has to stick its nose in the mix.

Small wonder we have the problems in society we do. Our country is a perfect example of the tail wagging the dog. Next, we’ll see a focus on mental health in gun issues, and the ACLU will take it to the Supreme Court as a violation of our civil rights.

Pete Klismet, Colorado Springs

Turmoil has only just begun

Those of you who live in School District 11 and thought the closure of Wasson only affected “those Wasson” students are in for a very rude awakening. The high school boundary has been redrawn and guess what? You thought your eighth- grader was going to Palmer, well guess again. They may be going to Coronado now. The same goes for every high school in District 11. Going to Doherty? Guess again, you may be going to Mitchell or Coronado now.

The turmoil that the District 11 school board has unleashed upon the district has only just begun. Big brother goes to Palmer and little brother wants to follow? Too bad. Little brother, now has to go to a different high school because of the school board actions. Choicing between schools will be very difficult because the board just transferred 950 students across the four remaining high schools. Palmer and Doherty, at or near full capacity, will be especially hard hit.

If you live along the boundary of Distinct 11 and have the capacity to go to an out of district high school, go for it. Out of district means lots of room and class sizes under 40 students per room.

Al Thomson, Colorado Springs

A relatively short commute

I was born and raised in Colorado Springs and have lived here most of my 61-plus years. I attended Helen Hunt, South Junior and Palmer High. While I am very sad and disappointed about the latest closures and students being shuttled to other schools in the district, I have a new perspective on what commuting to school means after my son started teaching music at the Hopi Junior-Senior High School in Keams Canyon, Ariz. A large portion of those students must travel by bus, everyday, both ways, for 2-4 hours a day of commuting. Losing friends and having to make new ones is not easy, but think about the Hopi students and try to be grateful for what will be a relatively short commute each day.

As for Wasson students being threatened with violence, I can understand the extreme concern of both parents and students and something must be done to stop that in its tracks. The district must address this absolutely unacceptable situation.

Georgia Moen, Colorado Springs

Stop voting the party line

My wife and I watched the State of the Union address last night and were impressed with the president’s speech. He has a positive plan for the country. However with the Republicans reaction to his speech we are sure nothing is going to get done. They sat on their hands instead of applauding the president’s proposals. Even when he was talking about women’s rights and gun control. How is this negative attitude toward everything he suggested going to help?

The people voted and showed that the conservative nature of the Republican Party is not what this nation needs right now. Our representatives in Congress have to work together for the common good and stop voting the party line!

Stan Bestol, Colorado Springs

Points on the State of the Union

I watched the Obama address last night with disdain. From a presidential-level speech perspective, it was sorely overdetailed and clearly a political statement intended to coerce the Republicans into supporting his agenda. Obama has chosen to ignore that he is president of all the people ... including the 49 percent who disagree with his philosophy. He has no mandate, so he finds he must bully the Congress toward his solutions. Leadership is required here, but that’s a skill of which he has proven himself to be grossly shy. Three points deserve special mention.

• I agree that we need comprehensive immigration reform. Shame on the Republicans for not embracing this concept earlier. Secure borders and a reasonable path to citizenship is the only way to resolve the problem of the 11 million undocumented aliens in our country ... continued “punishment” and

or deportation are not.

• Obama’s concept of “gun control” misses the issue. As much as we’re all deeply hurt by the continued pain resulting from unabashed gun violence, the ongoing process — lynching of gun ownership might make politicians feel better, but will not solve anything. We all live in a violent society of our own creation: we’ve saturated our entertainment lives with revenge-glorifying movies and games, and we’ve kicked all peace, love and compassion-oriented influence out of our schools and government administration. If we’re really sick of the gun violence, we must attack the sources of violence, not the symptoms.

• Obama is very clearly pushing the country toward socialism. He is playing his political cards during his tenure to set this in an irreversible direction. Obama avoids any direct reference to this path knowing most Americans wouldn’t like it if they really knew that socialism was his purpose ... so he shrouds his motives in “apple pie” rhetoric. At the risk of further bruising the Republican reputation, those Republicans in the Congress must, against all criticism, thwart any attempt by the Democrats to further this irresponsible and unprincipled agenda.

Robert B. Clarke, Woodland Park

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