Fraziers won't share Father's Day together but do share career in Colorado Rockies organization

by BROOKE PRYOR brooke.pryor@gazette.com - Published: June 14, 2013 | 7:00 pm 0

Parker and George Frazier don't have any Father's Day plans.

No trip to the golf course, no lunch, no fishing trip.

Instead, Parker will be in Las Vegas with the Colorado Springs Sky Sox, while his father, the Rockies commentator for ROOT Sports, will be in Denver calling Colorado's game against Philadelphia.

But it isn't unusual for the pair to spend the day apart, it's just a part of the profession.

"Baseball is a lonely business," said George, a former pitcher with a slew of major league teams, including the Cardinals, Yankees and Twins.

Parker, 24, began pursuing a career in baseball in 2007.

But baseball wasn't his first love. It fell behind golf and basketball as his favorite sports. When Parker realized, however, that he could play baseball beyond a high school or college level, he switched his focus.

Parker grew up in the clubhouse of the Rockies and in his parents' sporting goods store. His father, who's been broadcasting with the Rockies for 17 seasons, brought Parker around the team from a young age, but never pressured his youngest son to pursue baseball.

Eventually Parker found his way to his father's favorite pastime. In 2007 he was drafted in the eighth round by the Rockies out of high school and began his climb toward his goal of making the Rockies' 40-man roster.

Unlike some players who don't know what to expect after they've been drafted, Parker has always had his dad to give him advice.

"He's told me the ups and downs. He told me what will go wrong, how I'll feel, I will fail no matter what, and I'll have success too," Parker said. "He was just more there as a conscience on my shoulders, little angel and devil telling me what I'm not supposed to do and do."

For George, who has experienced nearly every level of success in the majors, including a World Series title with the Twins in 1987, watching his son play baseball fulfills one of his dreams.

"I have three sons, one played Division I basketball, one played Division I rugby and then there was Parker," George said. "And I have a daughter, but she's younger. And you always have that dream as a former athlete that maybe one of them will take to baseball, maybe they won't."

It's safe to say that Parker has taken to baseball, and on June 1, he moved up from the Double-A team in Tulsa to playing with the Sky Sox. Now, instead of being a plane ride away from his dad, Parker is just a short trip down Interstate 25.

But like any athlete, Parker isn't content with capping his career before he can achieve his dream. The ultimate goal is to pitch for the Rockies, and if that happens, his dad will be in a peculiar spot.

George usually watches Rockies games from the broadcasters' booth and adds commentary. But if Parker takes the field, he'll step out of the box and take a seat in the stands.

"If that dream happens to come true, I'm going to sit with his mom and his brothers and sisters, and share that experience with them," George said. "I just feel that's where I belong and I don't feel I could stand up there if he's getting his butt kicked, or he's doing well, or whatever it is and sit there and be a true analyst and not be a dad."

And though George often acts as his son's guide through his career, at the end of the day, there's one role that he holds most dear.

"It's fun for me to be a part of Parker's life and a part of his baseball life," George said. "But more importantly, just I'm proud to be his dad."

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