Recovery for commercial real estate remains elusive

RICH LADEN Updated: January 16, 2013 at 12:00 am • Published: January 16, 2013

Colorado Springs’ housing market rebounded in 2012, but the same can’t be said for commercial real estate.

Vacancy rates remained historically high late last year for Springs-area commercial buildings, while rents fell, according to a fourth-quarter report by Paul Turner of Turner Commercial Research in Colorado Springs. The report suggests the commercial market has far to go before it recovers from the area’s economic downturn.

The combined vacancy rate for local offices, shopping centers and industrial buildings was 11.9 percent in the fourth quarter, up slightly from 11.6 percent a yearearlier, Turner’s report shows.

For much of the last 15 years, the combined vacancy rate typically was in single digits. After the economy slumped in 2007, the rate climbed into double digits and has been there ever since — reaching as high as 12.9 percent in 2009.

Meanwhile, the combined average asking rent for commercial properties fell to $9.57 per square foot in the fourth quarter, down 1.5 percent from the same period a year earlier, Turner’s report showed. Four years earlier, the average asking rent was nearly $11 per square foot.

“It’s not gotten too much worse,” Turner said of the latest quarter. Still, he predicted that continued uncertainty about federal government policies will cause many businesses and investors to remain on the sidelines.

For example, an agreement by Congress and the Obama administration to avert the so-called fiscal cliff earlier this month delayed action until March 1 on what to do regarding scheduled spending cuts that could affect the Springs’ defense and aeropsace industries.

“Sequestration?” Turner said. “It’s still sitting out there.’

Randy Dowis, a principal with NAI Highland Commercial Group, said many business people and investors were on the sidelines waiting for the outcome of the November election. Then they waited out the fiscal cliff. Now, Dowis said, they’re uncertain what might happen with the debt ceiling and the nation’s ability to borrow money.

“How do plan for the future when the future is so uncertain?” Dowis said. “I think there are a lot of companies, nationally and locally, that are still hoarding cash. They’re not making any capital investments.”

Generally speaking, when employers aren’t hiring, they don’t need as much office space — whether existing leased space or new buildings.

Likewise, if manufacturers have slowed their operations, they and their suppliers don’t necessarily need as much industrial space. Retailers, meanwhile, aren’t apt to add as many stores if they see a stagnant economy.

The problems extend beyond empty offices or vacant storefronts. When vacancies rise and rents fall, commercial property values suffer, which leads to potential foreclosures.

Contact Rich Laden: 636-0228 Twitter @richladen
Facebook Rich Laden

Comment Policy
Colorado Springs Gazette has disabled the comments for this article.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
APR
19
APR
20
APR
21
APR
22
APR
23
APR
24
APR
25
APR
26
APR
27
APR
28
APR
29
APR
30
MAY
1
MAY
2
Advertisement